Streisand effect


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Streisand effect

An attempt to suppress information online that winds up making it more public. For example, if a hack that circumvents copy protection is published on the Web, as soon as it is legally challenged, numerous other sites copy and distribute the data. The term comes from an incident in 2003 when photos of Barbra Streisand's residence became even more public after she tried to prohibit them.
References in periodicals archive ?
With an ear, perhaps, tuned towards the Streisand Effect, the Sharjah Book Fair has given Abdullah al-Busais's The Taste of the Wolf ("Ta'em el-Thie'b") its coveted Best Arabic Novel Award.
When an attempt to hide or censor something has the complete opposite effect and makes said thing even more popular, it's called the Streisand effect.
A good example of the Streisand effect in action would be thepiratebay lawsuit that happened a few years ago.
Stephens said the threesome case was a powerful demonstration of the "Streisand effect", named after singer Barbra Streisand's failed attempt to have an aerial photo of her Malibu villa taken off a website.
In this article, we explore a series of cases that illustrate the broad range of behaviors that can elicit the Streisand effect, examine the Streisand effect as a communication phenomenon, and outline a framework for understanding the tactics used in struggles over perceived injustices--in this case, censorship.
Consequently, their attempts to evade, quash, or censor information about themselves make them particularly vulnerable to the Streisand effect, as Tom Cruise, Beyonce, and others have discovered (Wilson, 2013).
No, me neither, suggesting that those who plotted the massacre paid scant attention to the Streisand effect.
Still, in cases where actual harm is being done with erroneous information, Google's new form can allow parties to seek removal without triggering the "Streisand Effect," drawing more attention to an issue by seeking legal means to hide or remove it from public view.
It's a phenomenon known as the "Streisand effect," named for Barbara Streisand, who in 2003 sued the California Coastal Records Project in an attempt to have an aerial photo of her Malibu mansion removed from its database.
This is known as the 'Streisand effect' online, after a case where singer Barbara Streisand tried to suppress photos of her California beachside home froma publicly-available archive of photos taken to document coastal erosion.
In what became known as the Streisand effect , attempts to suppress information about something usually backfires and leads to even more publicity for the supposedly secret thing.
The Streisand effect (2003) began when an aerial archivist uploaded 12,700 sequential panoramic pictures of the Californian coastline to a website to highlight the degree of coastal erosion and to promote the environmental conservation of the stretch of land, the Irish Times reports.