Striapchii

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Striapchii

 

in the Muscovite state in the 16th century, a tsarist official who dealt with household matters, for example, at the khlebnyi dvor (grain yard) and koniushennyi dvor (stabling yard). The post was eliminated by Peter I; it was later restored under the judicial reform of 1775, when the term was applied to the assistant to the procurator for criminal affairs. The striapchii was charged with the legal defense of government interests, such as appanage estates. Beginning in the early 19th century, he was responsible for the supervision of places of incarceration. Under the judicial reform of 1864, striapchie were retained only in the capacity of poverennye (attorneys) in cases handled by the commercial courts.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
We know about one such incident from a solicitor (striapchii) of the Valdaiskii-Iverskii Monastery who reported that when Peter feasted in Novgorod on 7 October 1701 on the occasion of Sergei Lapshinskii's name day, he took it upon himself to debeard many of the guests in attendance, including Savva Borovitinov, an employee of the Novgorod metropolitan; the solicitor Iakov Lapshinskii; and the local nobleman Bogdan Neleelov.
In August 169 , for example, the widow and children of a murdered man, who held the high Moscow court rank of striapchii, sued the tsar against two men, who were peasants of a metropolitan, accusing them of murder, assault, theft, and property damage worth more than 200 rubles.