Strikebreaker


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Strikebreaker

 

in capitalist countries, an individual used by employers to disrupt strikes and to weaken workers’ unions. Strikebreakers are recruited from déclassé elements and from people without class consciousness, as well as from unemployed people who are pressed by need. Unemployment is the economic foundation of strikebreaking. In many capitalist countries, especially the USA, there are legal organizations that supply strike breakers to firms whose employees are involved in job actions. Bourgeois propaganda uses any means to hide the profound amorality of strikebreaking by evoking the right to work that labor allegedly enjoys under capitalism. Bourgeois labor law actively encourages strikebreaking.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Realizing their predicament, the strikebreakers agreed to stop work in exchange for safe passage out.
Ziegler refused to overturn the Pennsylvania Strikebreakers Act, a state law which prohibits using replacement workers as a means of breaking a union strike.
After a month-long stalemate, CTM national chieftain Fidel Velasquez announced on March 16 that the had formed a dual union composed of 20 strikebreakers, and that the new "union" had been certified by the government.
CFI brought in trainloads of strikebreakers and assembled a small army of gun-toting mine guards and company-paid sheriff's deputies to protect them.
Playing hardball with last year's strikebreakers, the Screen Actors Guild will soon unveil the IDs of as many as 100 thesps who crossed picket lines during the six-month strike against advertisers.
Last fall, when I heard the New York Daily News was hiring a lot of reporters and editors as strikebreakers, I was frustrated.
The union picketed the restaurant for three years, discouraging customers from entering, while the owners kept the restaurant functioning with the use of strikebreakers, many of them from the First Nations community.
Early twentieth-century newspapers and magazines glamorized the courage and rough masculinity of the professional strikebreaker, who had emerged as America's "last frontiersman," combining the "daring of the desperado" with the "acumen of the businessman." Men like "Boss" Jim Farley, who specialized in breaking streetcar strikes, and Ed Reed, who had played football at Yale in the 1890s, maintained their own private armies, and could send thousands of "soldiers" across the country at a moment's notice to break a strike.
"We only saw three vans go out being driven by managers and strikebreakers. You would normally get van after van after van going out from Perry Barr.
VIOLENCE erupted in Paphos yesterday when police confronted striking builders who tried to stop strikebreakers who were brought in to take over the work at a hotel construction site.