conch

(redirected from Strombus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Strombus: Strombidae

conch

(kŏngk, kŏnch, kôngk), common name for certain marine gastropodgastropod,
member of the class Gastropoda, the largest and most successful class of mollusks (phylum Mollusca), containing over 35,000 living species and 15,000 fossil forms.
..... Click the link for more information.
 mollusks having a heavy, spiral shell, the whorls of which overlap each other. In conchs the characteristic gastropod foot is reduced in size and the operculum, a horny plate located on the foot and used to seal the shell opening in many gastropods, has the appearance and function of a claw. During locomotion, the operculum secures a foothold in the sand, and the conch jumps forward by means of the quick contraction of a retractor muscle called the columella muscle. Thus the conch lacks the creeping motion of most gastropods. The king conch, Strombus gigas, found in the warmer waters of the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico, has a shell 10 to 12 in. (25–30 cm) long and may weigh up to 5 lb (2.3 kg). Similar in size and distribution is the queen conch, Cassis cameo. Its shell has been used in Europe to carve cameos. Conch shells range in color from white to red; they have been used by humans to fashion a number of items, such as buttons, ornaments, or the crude trumpets made from the shell of the trumpet conch, Charonia tritonis. This conch is similar in shape to the king and queen conchs but is much more slender and reaches a length of 20 in. (50 cm). C. tritonis is found in the Gulf of Mexico and the Indian Ocean. The largest conch and also one of the largest univalves in the world is the horse conch, Pleuroploca gigantea, having a shell length of 24 in. (60 cm). It is found along the Atlantic Coast from North Carolina to Brazil. The body can retreat entirely into the shell and remain there for months if unfavorable conditions prevail. An unusual conch shell is that of the spider conch, Lambis lambis, which has leglike projections. Spider conchs are voracious carnivores, common on coral reefs. They also feed on algae, as do the king conchs. Most conchs are carnivorous, feeding on bivalve mollusks; some are scavengers as well. They inhabit tropical waters and have been used as a food source for man. The conch is classified in the phylum MolluscaMollusca
, taxonomic name for the one of the largest phyla of invertebrate animals (Arthropoda is the largest) comprising more than 50,000 living mollusk species and about 35,000 fossil species dating back to the Cambrian period.
..... Click the link for more information.
, class Gastropoda, order Mesogastropoda.

Conch

Semidome vaulting of an apse or eastern end of a church.

conch

[käŋk]
(invertebrate zoology)
The common name for several species of large, colorful gastropod mollusks of the family Strombidae; the shell is used to make cameos and porcelain.

conch

The domed roof of a semicircular apse.

conch

1. any of various tropical marine gastropod molluscs of the genus Strombus and related genera, esp S. gigas (giant conch), characterized by a large brightly coloured spiral shell
2. the shell of such a mollusc, used as a trumpet
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus the style of the strombus galeatus stirrup-spout vessel took on a socio-religious role.
Sea-level fluctuations and severe ENSO events would have been detrimental to the bioproductivity of fringing reefs and shallow intertidal flats that supplied Rock Island villages with large quantities of shellfish, especially Strombus gibberulus/luhuanus, and inshore finfish taxa (Masse et al.
The sections of a glacier are, variously, a "smoothly-moulded bed," "bright-plucked water swaying in a pail," a "descending limb which was like the rude and knotty bossings of a strombus shell," and a "foot .
Population structure, larval dispersal, and gene flow in the queen conch, Strombus gigas, of the Caribbean.
1993, Kenchington & Glass 1998), Strombus gigas (Avila-Poveda & Baqueiro-Cardenas 2006), and Busycon caricas (Power et al.
Effect of temperature and acidification in Strombus gigas (Mesogastropoda: Strombidae) larvae.
Effect of protein origin in artificial diets on growth and survival of juvenile queen conch, Strombus gigas (Linne, 1758).
Diamond-bearing eclogite xenoliths * Cat's-eye calcite from Pakistan * Large chatoyant Brazilian emerald * Nonbeadcultured pearls from Strombus gigas * Purple scapolite * Synthetic star sapphire with diffusion-induced colour and star * Partially filled blue chalcedony * Presumably oiled ruby * Inclusions in synthetic star sapphire * Diamond slices * Large Namibian demantoid * Nephrite from British Columbia * Baroque cultured pearls * Ruby from Namya, Myanmar * Rock Creek sapphire update * Unusual tourmaline necklace * Conference reports.
Artisanal fisheries also exist for invertebrates (scallops, Argopecten ventricosus', conch, Strombus spp.
20) The British Museum mask has mother-of-pearl eyes and Strombus shell teeth, but no perforation in the mouth is mentioned in a recent detailed publication; interestingly, it was once broken on one side, as can be seen in a published photo of its rear side (McEwan et al.