strong

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strong

1. (of a colour) having a high degree of saturation or purity; being less saturated than a vivid colour but more so than a moderate colour; produced by a concentrated quantity of colouring agent
2. (of a wind, current, etc.) moving fast
3. (of a syllable) accented or stressed
4. (of certain acids and bases) producing high concentrations of hydrogen or hydroxide ions in aqueous solution
References in periodicals archive ?
China is now the largest producer and consumer of gold in the world, while market commentators have suggested that China's gold strategy is to create a strong currency, backed by large holdings of physical gold.
Among the reasons for the reduction were increasing property prices in Sydney, the largest city in Australia, a strong currency, and a drop in iron ore prices.
Despite increasingly strong currency headwinds toward the end of the year, we generated impressive sales growth in 2014, thanks to a steady stream of product launches, the contribution of our new brands, and the staying power of several of our best sellers," said Jean Madar, chairman and CEO of Inter Parfums, Inc.
The Fall Into Savings sale and the strong currency exchange rate are making it more affordable than ever to visit South Africa.
If the Scots vote Yes on September 18, as I hope they will, it will be in everyone's interest to form a strong currency union.
There is only one proven hedge against inflation and that is a strong currency.
Since the kingdom stands with a very stable and strong currency unit, compared to other countries, use of coins here is high.
Neil asked Hockey if he could name a single country in the G20 in such a strong economic position, with a national debt of 23%, a 3% fiscal deficit, 3% annual growth, 22 years of continuous growth, an unemployment rate of less than 6%, a strong currency and massive mineral resources.
The ratings, compiled by The Economist's intelligence unit, pointed that Singapore took the crown, due largely to the soaring cost of cars and utilities as well as a strong currency.
He identified these risks as the lack of adequate infrastructure and investments in research and development; power supply shortages and high electricity tariffs; high unemployment rate and export of labor, and a strong currency.
A strong currency makes Japanese-made exports more expensive overseas and erodes repatriated earnings.
The financial recession in Europe, in combination with high labour costs there and in Australia, where a strong currency is also a challenge for manufacturers, has forced automakers to rethink their international strategies.