strong acid

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strong acid

[′strȯŋ ′as·əd]
(chemistry)
An acid with a high degree of dissociation in solution, for example, mineral acids, such as hydrochloric acid, HCl, sulfuric acid, H2SO4, or nitric acid, HNO3.
References in classic literature ?
"I have to be careful," he continued, turning to me with a smile, "for I dabble with poisons a good deal." He held out his hand as he spoke, and I noticed that it was all mottled over with similar pieces of plaster, and discoloured with strong acids.
Compared with FKMs, Aflas grades are said to be more resistant to caustics of cleaning and sterilization, including steam, ozone, bases and strong acids. Aflas grades are said to resist the effects of sterilization processes and other applications that are too harsh for traditional sealing materials like silicone and EPDM.
* Model SPD140DDA--A mediumcapacity, modular system, used for drying aggressive organic solvents, strong acids, bases and combinatorial chemistry solvents.
Thermoplastics have impressive resistance to a wide range of corrosive chemicals, including chlorine, chlorine dioxide, strong acids and alkalis.
Strong acids, on the other hand, readily dissociate and liberate many free H+ ions.
The industrial coatings business of PPG Industries has introduced Corrokleen[TM] 44, a rust remover formulated without phosphates and other strong acids. Designed to be more effective at removing rust and mill scale, the citric-acid-based gel cleaner is safer for users and the environment than traditional grinding, sanding, media blasting, or chemical-based solutions.
Pumps can reportedly handle strong acids, alkalis and detergents, and are built for a long, maintenance free life.
The performance of the diaphragm are better because it is resistant to chemical agents, strong acids, mineral and organic acids, aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, halogenated solvents, and oxidizing environments.
The solutae 530 has a PFA-coated plunger that is resistant to salt solutions, weak and strong acids, as well as bases, which prevents the plunger and barrel from seizing together.
"The results emphasise that dietary advice should be targeted at strong acids rather than some of the commonly consumed soft drinks," he stated.
Forest soils in many areas of the world are becoming increasingly acidified, in part because of atmospheric deposition of strong acids produced by the burning of fossil fuels.