threadworm

(redirected from Strongyloides stercoralis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Strongyloides stercoralis: Trichinella spiralis, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura

threadworm

any of various nematodes, esp the pinworm
References in periodicals archive ?
A comparative trial of a single-dose ivermectin versus three days of albendazole for treatment of Strongyloides stercoralis and other soil-transmitted helminth infections in children.
Bronchoscopy was performed the next day and bronchoalveolar lavage showed a worm which was later identified as Strongyloides stercoralis (Figure 3).
Trichrome stains on smears prepared from stool concentrates on all three specimens were negative for protozoa but revealed Strongyloides stercoralis rhabditiform larvae.
Strongyloides stercoralis mesenteric lymphadenopathy: clue to the etiopathogenesis of intestinal pseudo obstruction in HIV-infected patients.
The lavage specimens included multiple pathogens: Strongyloides stercoralis, Pneumocystis jiroveci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, and Aspergillus species (Fig.
Fluctuations of larval excretion in Strongyloides stercoralis infection.
double dagger]) Trichiuris trichiura (n = 3), hookworms (n = 2), Ascaris lumbricoides (n = 2), Strongyloides stercoralis (n = 1), Entamoeba hystolitica (n = 1).
The most common nematodes to consider include Strongyloides stercoralis as part of a hyperinfection syndrome, Toxocara species or less commonly Baylisascaris species as agents of visceral larva migrans, or other nematode worms that may involve the CNS such as Angiostrongylus and Gnathostoma species.
Hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis infections occur when the infective larvae from the soil penetrate the bare skin, usually of the foot.
Microscopic observation of wet mount preparation of stool concentrate with saline revealed numerous live of Strongyloides stercoralis that were identified by the characteristic morphology, (~400 [micro]m length by 15 [micro]m breadth), with notched tail tip and genital primordium.
We report a patient with eosinophilic gastroenteritis, who was admitted to the hospital because of abdominal pain and distension, and was diagnosed as having Strongyloides stercoralis infestation after investigation.