strontium-90


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strontium-90

[′strän·tē·əm ′nīn·tē]
(nuclear physics)
A poisonous, radioactive isotope of strontium; 28-year half life with β radiation; derived from reactor-fuel fission products; used in thickness gages, medical treatment, phosphor activation, and atomic batteries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tepco revealed that readings of Strontium-90 at one site were 70 times the legal limit for safe disposal.
The Nuclear Regulation Authority has told TEPCO it will authorize the Fukushima plant to discharge water from within the barriers only if radiation readings are below 15 becquerels per liter for cesium-134, below 25 becquerels per liter for cesium-137, and below 10 becquerels per liter for strontium-90 and if other radioactive substances that emit gamma rays are not present.
(14) Strontium-90 with a half life of 50 years is deposited in bone marrow, the most radio-sensitive body tissue; it can cause bone cancer and leukemia and has been associated with stunted growth in children.
Strontium-90 ([Sr.sup.90]) beta radiotherapy is a noninvasive treatment using a hand held applicator (Figure 1).
These measures reflect the presence of radionuclides that emit these particles or rays, such as polonium-210, cesium-137, and strontium-90. (18) Each type of emission has different actions and potential health consequences.
In fact, the nontoxic form of strontium can eliminate radioactive strontium-90 from the body over time.
They showed that those children who later died of cancer before the age of 50 had levels of Strontium-90 in their stored baby teeth that was twice the level of those who were still alive at age 50.
All nuclear power plants produce radiation as well as radioactive poisons like the Cesium-137, Iodine-131 and Strontium-90 that have -been--and continue to be--spewed from the Fukushima plants.
"Over a hundred laboratories check food for radioactive isotopes, including caesium-137 and strontium-90. During 2010, Pubic Health and Safety Inspection conducted around 130 000 radiological sampling tests, of which 1738 samples contained an exceeding amount of radioactive contamination.
Spent fuel rods pose a serious risk because they are not stored inside the thick concrete containment vessel that surrounds nuclear reactor cores, and because spent fuel rods contain a more toxic mixture of radioisotopes (cesium-137, strontium-90, and iodine-131) than new nuclear fuel.
Radiochemical sample concentration is performed according to methods "LAND 64-2005, Determination of Radioactive Strontium-90 in the Specimens of Environmental Elements, Radiochemical Method".
Any nontoxic strontium salt (not radioactive strontium-90) can strengthen bone, according to Jonathan V.