Stryi

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Stryi

 

a city under oblast jurisdiction and administrative center of Stryi Raion, L’vov Oblast, Ukrainian SSR. Situated on the Stryi River, a right tributary of the Dnestr. Junction of railroad lines to L’vov, Khodorov, Drogobych, and Ivano-Frankovsk; highway junction. Population, 55,000 (1975). Stryi has enterprises for servicing the railroad industry, a plant for the production of forging and pressing equipment, a plant for the repair of railroad cars, and a plant for the manufacture of reinforced-concrete structural members. It also has enterprises of the woodworking, textile, and clothing industries. The city has a technicum specializing in the mechanization of agriculture.


Stryi

 

a river in L’vov Oblast, Ukrainian SSR; a right tributary of the Dnestr River. The Stryi measures 232 km in length and drains an area of 3,060 sq km. It originates in the Eastern Carpathians and flows mainly through a narrow valley. It is fed by various sources. High water is in spring; freshets occur in summer, autumn, and winter. The mean flow rate 17 km from the mouth is 45.2 cu m per sec; the maximum flow rate is 890 cu m per sec. There is ice on the river from November to April; freeze-up lasts 2–2.5 months. The cities of Turka, Stryi, and Zhidachov are situated on the Stryi.

References in periodicals archive ?
They were discovered and shot in the yard and the teacher and boyfriend were executed in Stryj, a larger neighboring town.
Transferred toponyms were common: Husiatyn, Stryj and Sambor are examples of names transferred from Western Ukraine.
(225) Mass murders of military and civilian population took place in Rohantyn, Grodno, Nowogrod, Sarny, Tarnopol, Wolkowysk, Oszmian, Swislocz, Molodeczn, Kosow Poleski, Chodorow, Zlczow and Stryj. In Grodno and some other locations soldiers of the Red Army murdered Polish POWs.
Born in 1910 in Stryj, Ukraine, scion of a Hasidic dynasty, Moskowitz immigrated with his family as a teenager to New York, where he attended City College and Columbia University, specializing in international affairs.
To express relationships, German uses GESCHWISTER for BROTHERS AND SISTERS, Polish uses STRYJ for the paternal uncle and WUJ for the maternal uncle, and SZWAGROSTWO for one's husband's brother and his wife.
During the War Mr Zielinski fled from his home town of Stryj, now part of Russia, and crossed Nazi-patrolled Europe to fight on the blood-soaked fields of Normandy.
Male Uncle Stryj Cousin Brat (father's side) Stryjeczny (father's side) Wujek (mother's side) Brat Cioteczny (mother's side) Female Aunt Stryjenka Cousin Siostra (father's side) Stryjeczna (father's side) Ciocia (mother's side) Siostra Cioteczna (Mother's side)