Struma

(redirected from Strymon)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

Struma

(stro͞o`mä), Gr. Strimón, river, 216 mi (348 km) long, rising in the mountains of W Bulgaria and flowing S, through NE Greece, to the Aegean Sea.

Struma

 

(in Greek, Strimon), a river in Bulgaria and Greece. The Struma is 415 km long, including 290 km in Bulgaria. It originates on the southwestern slopes of the Vitosha Mountains and drains an area of 17,000 sq km. In Bulgaria the river flows mainly through mountainous regions with narrow gorges alternating with intermontane basins, while in Greece it flows mainly through a wide valley into the Gulf of Strimon in the Aegean Sea. High water is from February to June, and low water is from August to September. The mean flow rate near the Bulgarian-Greek border is 80 cu m per sec. The maximum flow rate is approximately 500 cu m per sec.

The Struma is used mainly for irrigation. The Studena Reservoir, in Bulgaria, is on the Struma. Tributaries of the river have hydroelectric stations. The cities of Kiustendil and Blagoevgrad in Bulgaria and Serrai in Greece are situated in the valley of the Struma.

Struma

a river in S Europe, rising in SW Bulgaria near Sofia and flowing generally southeast through Greece to the Aegean. Length: 362 km (225 miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Johnson, 1990 Rekoa palegon (Cramer, 1780) X Chlorostrymon kuscheli (Ureta, 1949) Chlorostrymon simaethis (Drury, 1773) Strymon daraba (Hewitson, 1867) X X Strymon rufofusca (Hewitson, 1877) X Strymon davara (Hewitson, 1868) X X Strymon bubastus (Stoll, 1780) X X Strymon flavaria (Ureta, 1956) * X Ministrymon azia (Hewitson, 1873) X X Subfamilia Polyommatinae Leptotes trigemmatus (Butler, 1881) X X Hemiargus martha (Dognin, 1887) X Hemiargus ramon (Dognin, 1887) X X Nabokovia faga excisicosta (Dyar, 1913) Itylos titicaca (Weymer, 1890) Itylos colca Balint & Lamas, [1997] Itylos koa (H.
Mais, au bout de trois ou quatre mois, quand la rumeur se repandit qu'il avait vaincu les Macedoniens au-dela du Strymon, au pays des Odomantes, un certain nombre de gens admirent que la nouvelle etait vraie, tandis que la plupart persistait dans leur doute (55).
Druce, 1872) 205 Calycopis bactra 2 (Hewitson, 1877) 206 Calycopis xeneta 2 c (Hewitson, 1877) 207 Calycopis trebula 1 2 b c (Hewitson, 1868) 208 Calycopis pisis 1 2 b c (Godman & Salvin, 1887) 209 Strymon melinus 1 2 b c (Hubner, [1813]) 210 Strymon rufofusca 1 2 b c (Hewitson, 1877) 211 Strymon albata 2 b c (C.
Density-dependent mating tactics in the gray hairstreak, Strymon melinus (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae).
Edwards) Cirsium (associated) arvense, Eriogonum umbellatum, Senecio integerrimus Speyeria Callippe Cirsium callippe Fritillary canovirens, (Bois.) Senecio integerrimus Speyeria Coronis Apocynum coronis (Behr) Fritillary androsaemifolium, Cirsium undulatum, Dipsacus sylvestrus Speyeria Great Cirsium cybele (F.) Spangled undulatum Fritillary Strymon Gray Cleome serrulata, Dipsacus melinus Hairstreak Geranium sylvestrus (Hubner) viscossimum, (ova) Solidago occidentalis Vanessa annabella West Coast Chrysothamnus (Field) Lady nauseous, Taraxacum officinale Vanessa Red Admiral Urtica atalanta (L.) dioica (ova, LFP), Elaeagnus angustifolia (Sugar) Vanessa Painted Lady Chrysothamnus cardui (L.) nauseous, Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus, Cirsium arvense, Cirsium canovirens.
Especies como Ocaria aholiba, Brangas coccineifrons, Brevianta undulata, Marachina maraches, Hypostrymon asa, Panthiades paphlagon, Strymon bubastus, Timaeta eronos, Timaeta trochus, estuvieron representadas por un solo individuo lo cual indica que son especies regularmente ajenas a la cima o que no hacen "Hilltopping".
Secondly, Orpheus's lament on the banks of the River Strymon at the final loss of Eurydice underlined the origins of art: art is born out of suffering, out of loss and absence; art provides a presence to make up for this void.
[35] And in fable 11, Strymon , the inconsolable friend of the murderously betrayed Rhesus, is transformed into the stone called Pausilype, "which erases all solicitude" (qui efface toute solicitude; F:274), only after throwing himself into the Palestine river: "Seeking some comfort that might erase his great sorrow, / [He] casts himself into the Palestine from a deadly cliff" (iE:275, verses 7-8).
Likewise, gymnosperms are used by only a handful of species in Pieridae (Neophasia in Pierinae) and Lycaenidae (Callophrys, Eumaeus, and Strymon in Theclinae, and Theclinesthes and Luthrodes in Polyommatinae).
Also important in the myth is the setting where Orpheus bemoans the loss of Eurydice, a rocky, inhospitable, barren place near the River Strymon:
For seven long moons by Strymon's desert side, He wept unceasing to the hollow tide; While overhead, as still he wept and sung, Aerial rocks in shaggy prospect hung; Meek grew the tigers when in Caverns hoar He sung his tale of sorrow o'er and o'er; The solemn oaks at the magic song Had ears to joy, and slowly mov'd along - Far round, the forest heard the tones of grief And felt, through every trembling l[eaf], Touch'd at the heart.(23)