Stuxnet


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

Stuxnet

A worm (virus) that was designed to attack Siemens programmable logic controllers (see PLC) and Windows-based industrial software. First identified in 2009, Stuxnet infections were found in Iran, Indonesia, India and other countries with an estimated 100,000 computers infected. Most widely reported was Iran's nuclear generation program, which was damaged when Stuxnet caused some of its centrifuges to run too fast. See Flame virus, worm and SCADA attack.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Stuxnet virus is believed to have destroyed up to 1,000 centrifuges at the Natanz plant.
The firewall "practically neutralizes industrial [acts of] sabotage, such as (those potentially launched by) Stuxnet, in electrical grids and suchlike," he wrote, adding, "By relying on (our) youths, we will turn threats into opportunities."
The 1.0 version of Stuxnet is reckoned to have infected Iranian computers after being copied onto USB sticks which were left in locations in India and Iran known to be used by Iranian nuclear scientists and their contacts.
Stuxnet also slipped by the Windows' defenses using the equivalent of a stolen passport.
Microsoft issued a patch for Stuxnet in 2010, but a recent report
25, the Stuxnet attackers "signed" an enhanced version of the malware using a stolen digital certificate, Zetter writes.
He further said that malicious code such as Stuxnet does not respect national boundaries and the cyber-attack code developed by South Korea could rebound and end up damaging South Korean infrastructure that uses the same technologies, the report added.
The paper also confirmed that the Stuxnet virus was created with the help of a secret Israeli intelligence unit.
Stuxnet is the most sophisticated piece of malware in history, and it was discovered in the wild earlier this year.
Researchers at Symantec Corporation have uncovered a version of the Stuxnet computer virus that was used to attack Iran's nuclear programme in November 2007, two years earlier than previously thought.
Researchers from Symantec have found and analysed a version of the Stuxnet cyber sabotage malware that predates previously discovered versions by at least two years.