Stymphalian birds


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Stymphalian birds

(stĭmfā`lēən), in Greek mythology, dangerous man-eating birds that infested the woods around Lake Stymphalus in Arcadia. As his fifth labor, Hercules frightened the birds into the air with a huge rattle and then killed them.

Stymphalian Birds

 

in ancient Greek mythology, birds with bronze wings, talons, and beaks that nested in Arcadia near Lake Stymphalia (Lake Zaraka). By casting off their arrow-like feathers the birds were able to kill animals and people. The destruction of the Stymphalian birds was the fifth labor of Heracles.

Stymphalian birds

venomous Arcadian flock shot by Hercules; sixth Labor. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Hall, 149]
See: Hunting
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References in periodicals archive ?
Stymphalian birds devoured flesh, leaving trails of bones
Hercules' efforts to dispel the Stymphalian Birds and capture the Mares of Diomedes may have exposed him to zoonoses acquired from birds and equids.
Other writers say that the shooter was aiming at the evil Stymphalian birds, represented by Aquila, Cygnus, and Lyra (the latter originally represented as a vulture).
Labors of Heracles by Mythical Arrangement Nemean Lion Lernaean Hydra Ceryneian Hind Erymanthian Boar Stables of Augeias Stymphalian Birds Cretan Bull Mares of Diomedes Hippolyte's Girdle Cattle of Geryon Apples of the Hesperides Capture of Cerberus Figure 7.
The thick marsh habitat of the Stymphalian birds worked against Herakles.
Perhaps it was Hercules, aiming at Aquila and Cygnus, which were imagined to be the Stymphalian birds.
Brown saw in this arrangement of stars an allusion to the fifth of Hercules' 12 Labors - his encounter with the man-eating Stymphalian birds.