Styracaceae


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Related to Styracaceae: Symplocaceae

Styracaceae

 

(storax), a family of dicotyledonous plants including trees and strubs. The leaves are alternate and often covered with stellate or squamose hairs; other parts of the plant, including the stem and axis of inflorescence, are covered with similar hairs. The regular flowers are usually bisexual and four-or five-parted. The fruit is often a capsule, drupe, or nutlet. There are about 150 species, belonging to 12 genera. The plants are found predominantly in tropical and subtropical regions of East Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Americas. There is one genus in tropical West Africa and one in the Mediterranean region. Most important are species of the genus Styrax, from which valuable resins, aromatic oils, and other products used in medicine and perfumery are obtained. The resin benzoin is obtained from the species S. benzoin and S. tonkinense. Some species of the family Styracaceae are cultivated as ornamentals.

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A few of the threatened endemics are nested inside clades restricted to South America or sister to lineages from this region (10 species in 6 genera: Crescentia (Bignoniaceae), Doerpfeldia (Rhamnaceae), Elekmania, Gesneria, Rhvtidophyllum, and Styrax (Styracaceae), see Appendix S3).
De estas, cinco son endemicas de Selva Atlantica: Banara parviflora (Flacourtiaceae), Cestrum euanthes (Solanaceae), Styrax leprosus (Styracaceae), Albizia edwallii (Leguminosae) y Pilocarpus pennatifolius (Rutaceae).
Plant families that were used as substrate were Asteraceae, Bromeliaceae, Casuarinaceae, Dilleniaceae, Ericaceae, Fabaceae, Loranthaceae, Lythraceae, Malpighiaceae, Malvaceae, Melastomataceae, Myrtaceae, Poaceae, Polygonaceae, Rubiaceae, Sapindaceae, Styracaceae, Urticaceae, Verbenaceae, Vochysiaceae, being some families exclusive of one of the areas.
Siyrax formosana Matsum.; 3560 Styracaceae able 2 The phenolics and [IC.sub.50] values of Taiwanese native plants against DPPH and OH free radicals.
Epigynous perianth characterizes the fin-winged fruits of Aizoaceae, Apiaceae, Begoniaceae, Burmanniaceae, Combretaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Dioscoreaceae, Lecythidiaceae, Haloragaceae, Hernandiaceae, Onagraceae, and Styracaceae. Hypogynous perianth characterizes fruits of the Brassicaceae, Cardiopteridaceae, Celastraceae, Cunoniaceae, Cyrillaceae, Fabaceae, Herreriaceae, Lophopixidaceae, Malvaceae, Melianthaceae, Nyctaginaceae, Pedaliaceae, Polygalaceae, Polygonaceae, Phyllanthaceae, Rhamnaceae, Rutaceae, Sapindaceae, Simaroubaceae, Trigoniaceae, Tropaeolaceae, and Zygophyllaceae.
Esto es sumamente importante y valioso, por ejemplo para el genero Bycrsera y en general para muchas Anacardiaceae, Styracaceae y representantes lenosos de otras familias.
Plants with the greatest spider abundance were Senna rugosa (Fabaceae) with 17.14%; Styraxferrugineus (Styracaceae) with 12.86% and Banisteriopsis campestris (Malpighiaceae) with 10% of the all spiders.