Subaru Telescope


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Subaru Telescope

(soo -bă-roo) An 8-meter Ritchey–Chrétien telescope of the Japan National Astronomy Observatory sited on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Its meniscus primary mirror (f/1.8) is controlled by active optics.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Measurements are also taken with an optical-infrared telescope at Gemini Observatory and Subaru Telescope, also in Hawaii.
By combining the Subaru Telescope with one of the world's most powerful cameras, astronomers in Japan were able to capture images of 1,824 supernovae.
The findings are based on data from NASA Kepler spacecraft's second mission, K2, and follow-up observations using ground-based telescopes, including the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii and the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) in Spain.
Batygin and Brown are using the Subaru Telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii to try to do just that.
Looking at old images of Coma taken by the Subaru telescope in Hawaii, Koda and colleagues easily confirmed that those 47 were really there.
Eight-hundred fifty-four "ultra-dark galaxies" in the Coma Cluster have been discovered by a team of researchers from Stony Brook (N.Y.) University and the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan analyzing data from the 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope. The findings surpass the 2014 discovery of 47 mysterious dark galaxies and suggests that clusters are the key environment for the evolution of these mysterious dark galaxies.
For example, the combination of a first-generation coronagraph (a technique to suppress the effect of the central bright star) and adaptive optics (CIAO+AO36) on the Subaru Telescope (7) has
The discovery was jointly made by researchers from the state-run Graduate University of Advanced Studies and the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan using the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii.
The international team of astronomers, led by Masami Ouchi of the University of Tokyo, Japan, first identified the remote galaxy after scanning a large patch of sky with the Subaru Telescope atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii.
In 2007 the 8.2m Subaru telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii observed Leo II and detected over 80,000 stars down to a visible magnitude of 26.
Masayuki Tanaka, a special researcher at the University of Tokyo, said his team discovered the galaxy cluster after analyzing X-ray data from the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton observatory and near-infrared ray data from the Subaru telescope in Hawaii.