subduction zones


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Related to subduction zones: Tectonic plates

subduction zones

[səb′dək·shən ‚zōnz]
(geology)
Regions where portions of the earth's tectonic plates are diving beneath other plates, into the earth's interior. They are defined by deep oceanic trenches, lines of volcanoes parallel to the trenches, and zones of large earthquakes that extend from the trenches landward.
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Mexico's location makes the country prone to strong earthquakes because it is in a so-called subduction zone
The structure of the Costa Rican subduction zone is heavily influenced by the heterogeneity of the subducting Cocos plate.
That means researchers can set up monitoring stations on land, much closer to the place where slow slip is happening--about 15 kilometers below the shoreline--than they can at other subduction zones. "In Costa Rica.
Minor and moderate seismic events in Figures 3 and 4, respectively, are concentrated along the Pacific subduction zone and intracrustal discontinuities of the North Andes Microplate.
Therefore, subduction zones may move appreciably over timescales of 100 million years relative to some other reference frame.
The Indian Ocean earthquake occurred between the Eurasian and Indian plates along a subduction zone, an area where one plate tries to dive beneath another.
The fault lines that caused that quake make up the Sumatra subduction zone, which last produced a magnitude 9 temblor in 1833.
These high concentrations of dissolved carbon species, previously unknown at great depth in Earth, suggest they are helping to ferry large amounts of carbon from the subduction zone into the overlying mantle wedge where they are likely to alter the mantle and affect the cycling of elements back into Earth's atmosphere.
The new earthquake devices will be installed under the ocean on the Hikurangi Subduction Zone within the week.
The discovery of this unusual clay in the Tohoku slip zone suggests that other subduction zones in the northwest Pacific where this type of clay is present - from Russia's Kamchatka peninsula to the Aleutian Islands - may be capable of generating similar, huge earthquakes, Rowe added.
The new subduction zone--where a tectonic plate slides beneath another plate and into Earth's mantle--could mark the beginning of a new phase of the so-called Wilson Cycle, whereby tectonic plate movement breaks up supercontinents, opens oceans and creates new subduction zones that then shrink oceans, bringing the continents back together.
This once 4000 km wide ocean is thought to have vanished along at least two subduction zones during the Jurassic and the Cretaceous; one intraoceanic and one under the Eurasian margin.