Submarine Ridge

Submarine Ridge

 

an elongated steep-sided elevation of ocean and sea floors.

Submarine ridges extend hundreds and thousands of kilometers in length and reach widths of several hundred km. Some peaks often rise above sea level to form islands. In the submarine continental margins, submarine ridges are relatively rare, and their structure is analogous to the structure of mountains on the adjacent parts of the continents. In the transition zone, submarine ridges appear chiefly as island arcs; they are also found at the bottom of deep-sea troughs of such marginal seas as the Yamato in the Sea of Japan or the Bowers in the Bering Sea. On the ocean floor, submarine ridges may be block, block-folding, or volcanic ridges. Volcanic ridges usually result from the concretion of volcanic cones. The largest submarine ridges are mid-ocean ridges. These differ from the submarine ridges on the ocean floor and in transition zones with respect to the morphology and structure of the earth’s crust.

References in periodicals archive ?
The atolls have formed over the longitudinally running Laccadive-Chagos submarine ridge and are spread over 90,000 square kilometers with a land area of just 1% in a 300 square kilometer space and a maximum elevation of just over 2 meters above the mean sea level.
In Chile is found in the Salas y Gomez submarine ridge (Parin et al., 1997; Eschmeyer 2015).
That sensitivity is a result of a submarine ridge beneath the ice shelf that was only discovered in 2009 when an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle mapped the seabed beneath the ice.
Scientists recently measured for the first time the turbulence at the Samoan Passage--a 25-mile opening in a giant submarine ridge in the South Pacific where 6 million cubic meters of water force their way northward every second.
Earlier this summer, researchers reported that sonar and video surveys of a submarine ridge in Lake Huron revealed structures similar to those used to guide caribou by modern-day hunters in the high Arctic (SN: 7/4/09, p.
A new hemerocoetinefish, Osopsaron karlik (Percophidae, Trachinoidei) from the Nazca submarine ridge. Jpn.
Geographical distribution: this species is abundant in the Nazca submarine ridge, especially east of 84[degrees]W, off Peru (Prosvirov, 1990; Rudjakov et al., 1990; Parin et al., 1997) where it has been commercially fished by industrial vessels (Parin et al., 1997; Arana & Venturini, 1991).
Catherine Stickley of the University of Tromso in Norway and colleagues examined sediments drilled from a site on a submarine ridge about 250 kilometers from the North Pole.
The researchers used side-scan sonar and video-equipped, remotely operated vehicles to survey two patches of lake bottom that together cover about 72 square kilometers of the submarine ridge. In one of those areas, sonar data reveal a sinuous line of small boulders 350 meters long that seem to have been arranged to visually accentuate a low ridge.
Submarine ridges that are not natural components of the continental margin are subject to a 350 nm cut-off; if they are a natural component, the continental shelf can extend beyond 350 nm, but shall not exceed 100 nm from the 2500 m isobath.
Those in Belize, for example, lie on non-volcanic submarine ridges.

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