Suborbital Flight

Suborbital Flight

 

the flight of a spacecraft along a ballistic trajectory at a velocity less than that needed to achieve earth orbit. A suborbital flight consists of three phases: flight during operation of the launch vehicle’s rocket engines, flight along a ballistic trajectory, and reentry with atmospheric braking and descent. US manned suborbital flights were carried out in Mercury spacecraft by A. Shepard on May 5, 1961, and by V. Grissom on July 21, 1961. Grissom’s flight covered 504 km in approximately 16 min, reaching a maximum altitude of 189 km.

References in periodicals archive ?
His goal was to go into suborbital flight in which he would experience weightlessness.
The company is aiming to deliver its New Glenn rocket by 2021, while launching humans in a suborbital flight later this year atop its rocket-and-capsule New Shepard.
The price for a seat on a Virgin Galactic suborbital flight costs $250,000.
(Grissom was the astronaut aboard the Liberty Bell 7 on a suborbital flight. After splashdown the hatch of the capsule blew and it filled with water.
The vehicles will take off like traditional airplanes using jet fuel and fly to a special-use airspace where rocket boosters launch the craft into suborbital flight. To land, the craft drops out of suborbital flight and lands like a traditional airplane.
Sites such as Newquay, Glasgow Prestwick and Snowdonia will be boosted by a new PS2m fund to grow their suborbital flight, satellite launch and spaceplane ambitions.
According to the book, Johnson helped plot the trajectory of Alan Shepard's suborbital flight and reportedly confirmed the computer-generated orbital parameters of John Glenn's Mercury mission.
SpaceShipTwo is designed to be flown by a crew of two and carry up to six passengers on a high-speed suborbital flight to the fringes of space.
The Pacific Spaceport Complex-Alaska will serve as the company's base of operations for high performance suborbital flight testing and ultimately for operational orbital missions.
The NASA Sounding Rocket Program provides opportunities for suborbital flight through the Flight Opportunities Program for early flight evaluation of promising technology.
In 1961, NASA launched Ham the Chimp aboard a Mercury-Redstone rocket from Cape Canaveral; Ham was recovered safely from the Atlantic Ocean following his 16 1/2-minute suborbital flight.
According to the company's official website, passengers undertake "a half-hour suborbital flight to 100km (330,000 feet) and then return to a landing at the take-off runway."