Subpolar Urals

Subpolar Urals

 

a section of the Urals between the upper course of the Khulga River (Ob’ Basin) and the latitudinal stretch of the Shugor River (Pechora Basin); it intersects the main range at 64° N lat. The Subpolar Urals extend from northeast to southwest for 230 km, with widths to 150 km. The region includes the highest peaks in the Urals: Mount Narodnaia (1,894m), Mount Karpinskii (1,878m), and Mount Manaraga (1,820m). The highest axial section of the region is composed of quartzites and crystalline schists; the western and eastern slopes consist of metamorphic and sedimentary rocks (sandstones, limestones). There are small glaciers (Gofman, Varsonof eva) and numerous areas of perpetual snow. Traces of mountain and valley glaciation are common. At elevations below 500m, the slopes are covered with taiga forests (fir, larch, birch); higher, there are mountain tundras, cliffs, and rocky placers.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The locality itself is situated in a remote area of Tyumen Oblast, near the crest of the Ural Mountains in a portion of that range known as the Subpolar Urals (Pripolyarnyy Ural).
Neroika village is the headquarters of the Neroisk Exploration and Development Company, the most important sponsor of Polar and Subpolar Urals exploration and the agency in charge of mining at the Dodo site.
The first discovery of large quartz crystals in the Subpolar Urals took place in 1927, along the upper reaches of the Lyapni River.
1) The Dodo deposit formed at greater depths than other deposits of the Subpolar Urals.
The mine site is near the crest of the Subpolar Urals (a range connecting the Polar Urals to the north and the Northern Urals on the south).
A detailed discussion of the formation of Subpolar Urals Alpine-type cleft deposits may be found in Bukanov (1974), and Burlakov (1989) (see also under "Paragenesis" in the companion article on the Dodo mine, page 431-432 in this issue).
The Puiva and Dodo deposits have long been recognized as among the most remarkable occurrences in the Subpolar Urals.
1) Zeolites and fluorapophyllite are very common; no other deposit in the Polar and Subpolar Urals contains such a variety of these minerals.
The most beautiful fluorapatites, as far as the author knows, ever found in the Subpolar Urals came from the Puiva mine: colorless, pale bluish or pale greenish, transparent tabular crystals from 4 to 7 cm
The Puiva mine in the Subpolar Ural Mountains is an extraordinary Alpine cleft-type deposit which has yielded the world's finest specimens of ferro-axinite, world-class quartz gwindels, excellent titanite crystals, and a variety of other species.