substellar object

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substellar object

[‚səb‚stel·ər ′äb‚jekt]
(astronomy)
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Substellar and exoplanetary models are extremely complex and their production is an inherently multidisciplinary exercise in physics, chemistry and high-performance computing.
Brown dwarfs are "failed stars," relatively lightweight substellar objects that commonly are thought to be born like stars--within a dense, heavy blob of material embedded within a giant, cold, dark, molecular cloud that collapses under the weight of its own gravity to give birth to a fiery new baby star.
As a result, the hottest point on Kepler-76b isn't the substellar point ("high noon") but a location offset by about 10,000 miles.
The equilibrium temperature at the substellar point - the equatorial part of the planet where the sun is directly overhead - approaches 2,900 degrees Kelvin, or about 2,627 degrees Celsius.
That places this brown dwarf among the 10 nearest stellar or substellar systems, researchers report in an article posted online April 5 at arXiv.
2) Substellar objects with true masses above the limiting mass for thermonuclear fusion of deuterium are 'brown dwarfs', no matter how they formed or where they are located.
If the person that has the stellar performance is going to be able to exercise that option, the person who's had substellar performance will probably also be able to exercise it because the market is just rocking that company along.
The second study revealed that WISE had spotted a veritable treasure trove of new celestial objects, consisting of a host of sparkling stars and relatively cool substellar objects called brown dwarfs, which are "failed stars.
The findings come from observations using the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii and the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile during the Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters (SONYC) survey.
Eventually, these discs become unstable and fragment to form low-mass stars and substellar objects, like brown dwarfs and planets," he added.
Black says he's reluctant to call the object a planet, because this substellar mass and its environment would bear little, if any, resemblance to known planets.
Becklin of the University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy in Honolulu, "there is at the moment not a single confirmed example of an extra-solar object, either isolated or in orbit around a star, that is unambiguously substellar.