Suburban sprawl


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Suburban sprawl

The spreading of a city’s population out into the surrounding countryside, forming suburbs.
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While a prolific social phenomenon like suburban sprawl is no doubt
But in retrospect, Venturi and Scott Brown's characterization of suburban sprawl as "the current vernacular of the United States," or the "people's architecture as the people want it," was naive.
And for quite a while there I believer this led to suburban sprawl, as many of the younger people coming into their home-buying and child-rearing years found they could go larger if they were willing to make the commute back to civilization for work, groceries and the other necessities of life.
For example, cities with adequate mass transit and sustainable urban building practices can reduce suburban sprawl and also rely less on subprime mortgages to house a growing population.
DISAPPEARING DESERT: THE GROWTH OF PHOENIX AND THE CULTURE OF SPRAWL considers the social and cultural forces that contribute to suburban sprawl in the U.S., using Phoenix's experiences as a microcosm of U.S.
We retain a link even from suburban sprawl Ohio to the natural world in New York State through Conservationist.
Will we have to accept radically new ways of living in order to curtail suburban sprawl? Can brownfield sites accommodate all of the Southeast's housing needs?
The husband-and-wife team of town planners Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk are typically credited as the founders of new urbanism, a style of community design that embraces mixed use (commercial and residential) development in pedestrian-friendly and green space-rich neighborhoods-much like the old neighborhoods many baby-boomers remember before suburban sprawl made us all slaves to our cars.
By virtue of pushing the population into the suburban sprawl, the garden is in fact responsible for our reliance on private motor transport and hence the uncontrolled CO2 emissions that now threaten the planet with global warming.
* The number increases every year as a result of continuous urban and suburban sprawl and the high cost of central sewer systems.
There are several promising grassroots trends that counter the suburban sprawl: migration of people to the country to adopt rural lifestyles; appetite for locally produced food and experiences; and the protection of historic and natural resources.
If shrinking populations lower the cost of living in downtowns, it could help curb suburban sprawl, Hiemstra points out, recommending the development of policies to enhance urban living and return once-sprawled-upon lands to a more natural state.