Suceava


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Suceava

(so͞ochä`vä), town (1990 pop. 107,988), NE Romania, in Bukovina, on the Suceava River. It is a commercial center and has industries that manufacture food products, paper, wood products, and cellulose. Suceava was the capital of Moldavia from 1388 to 1565, when it was succeeded by Iasi. A historic shrine with many churches (notably the 16th-century St. George Church, a famous pilgrimage center), the town is also the seat of an Orthodox metropolitan. Nearby is the renowned 17th-century Dragomirna monastery.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Suceava

 

a district in northeastern Rumania. Area, 8,600 sq km. Population, 645,000, of which more than 27 percent is urban (1974). The administrative center is the city of Suceava.

Suceava District accounts for 1.8 percent of Rumania’s gross industrial output. It is the country’s leading producer of timber (more than one-half of the district is forested), wood products, and pulp and paper. There are also food-processing, textile, and leather and footwear industries. Ores of manganese, nonferrous metals, barite, and sulfur are mined, as well as rock salt. Sucea-va’s agricultural production accounts for about 3 percent of Rumania’s gross output. The main crops are corn, wheat, barley, hemp, and sugar beets. Fruits and vegetables are also grown. Suceava leads all other districts of Rumania in potato harvests, the number of cattle (278,000 head in 1974), and milk production.


Suceava

 

a city in northeastern Rumania; situated on the Suceava River, a tributary of the Siret. Administrative center of the district of Suceava. Population, 51,600 (1974; 75,700 including suburbs). Suceava, a major transportation junction, has large pulp-and-paper and woodworking combines and enterprises for the production of foodstuffs, machines, leather and footwear, and knitted goods.

From the 14th to the mid-16th century, Suceava was the capital of the principality of Moldavia. Architectural monuments include the 14th-century castle of Cetatea de Scaun (the former name of Suceava) and churches of the 15th to the 17th century, including those of St. Gheorghe, St. Dumitru, and St. Ilie.

REFERENCE

Suceava. Bucharest, 1968.

Suceava

 

(in Russian, Suchava), a river in northern Rumania and in Chernovtsy Oblast, Ukrainian SSR (upper course); a right tributary of the Siret River (Danube River basin). The Suceava is 160 km long and drains an area of about 3,800 sq km. It rises in the Eastern Carpathian Mountains and, in its middle and lower courses, flows over the Suceava plateau. High water occurs in the spring and flash floods in the summer. Low water occurs in autumn and winter. The mean flow rate is about 20 cu m per sec, and the river carries a great deal of sediment. The city of Suceava is located on the river.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prospex holds a 50% stake in the exploration area of the EIV-1 Suceava concession through its wholly-owned subsidiary PXOG Massey Ltd.
The municipality of Suceava is the seat of the homonymous county, situated in the North-East Region of Romania.
Summary: Buchare, July 03, 2010, SPA -- The death toll in flooding in eastern Romania rose to 23 on Saturday when the body of a man was recovered in the northeastern Suceava region, officials said.
The legal contract was awarded to them by Birmingham-based management consultancy STC which heads up a five-partner consortium appointed to undertake the transformation of Suceava, a key province located in the north of the former communist country.
According to prosecutors in the northern city of Suceava, Gerald David Bowditch and Colin Robert Martin joined forces with two locals to recruit and smuggle people from the county of Suceava, a poor Romanian region, into Britain.
With a surface of 36,850 square km (15.46% of the entire surface of the country), the North-Eastern Region of development, the largest Romanian region of development, groups around 6 counties: Bacau, Botocani, Neamf, Iasi, Suceava and Vaslui.