Suevi

Suevi

 

(also Suebi), a group of Germanic tribes, including the Semnones, Hermunduri, and Quadi, that lived in the basins of the Elbe, Main, Neckar, and upper Rhine rivers from the first century B.C. to the second century A.D. The Suevi were first described by Julius Caesar, who in 58 B.C. defeated the Suevi under their leader Ariovistus, who had crossed the Rhine about 71 B.C. and was attempting to establish his rule in Gaul. After Tacitus, the term “Suevi” gives way in historical sources to the names of the individual Suevi tribes. However, it has not fallen into complete disuse; it is often used to refer to the Quadi, who established a kingdom—the Suevian Kingdom—in northwestern Spain in the early fifth century. The Alamanni, or Swabians, were evidently descended from the Suevi, in particular, from the Semnones.

References in periodicals archive ?
He traces the tradition to the Germanic invaders of the Iberian Peninsula, the Suevi and Vandals and the various forms of the name "Hellequin" to their Germanic root, Helle, the realm of the dead.
However, given the provenance and date, it is likely to be plunder from one of the Roman towns in Gallaecia or northern Lusitania captured by the Suevi during the fifth century.
Asi se dirigia entonces el embajador al emperador Niceforo: <<Nos Langobardi scilicet, Saxones, Franci, Lotharingi, Bagorarii, Suevi, Burgondionis, tanto designamur, ut inimicos nostros commoti nil aliud contumeliarum nisi: Romane
History of the Kings of the Goths,Vandals and Suevi, 1966, pp.
The invasions of 376 and 405-406 are not to be attributed to periodic incursions by tribal Tervingi and Greuthungi, Vandals, Alans, and Suevi.
On the exile of four thousand monks, see Isidore of Seville, History of the Goths, Vandals and Suevi 78, trans.
Tacitus thought that the Suevi were characterised by their distinctive, knotted, hair.
124: <<Inter Gundericum Vandalorum et Hermericum Suevorum reges, certamine orto Suevi in Nerbasis montibus obsidentur a Vandalis>>.
Visigoths, Burgundians, Franks, Suevi and Vandals were all settled as federates on large tracts of Gaul and Spain, and were evolving into Germanic kingdoms under only the most nominal Roman overlordship.