Suevi

Suevi

 

(also Suebi), a group of Germanic tribes, including the Semnones, Hermunduri, and Quadi, that lived in the basins of the Elbe, Main, Neckar, and upper Rhine rivers from the first century B.C. to the second century A.D. The Suevi were first described by Julius Caesar, who in 58 B.C. defeated the Suevi under their leader Ariovistus, who had crossed the Rhine about 71 B.C. and was attempting to establish his rule in Gaul. After Tacitus, the term “Suevi” gives way in historical sources to the names of the individual Suevi tribes. However, it has not fallen into complete disuse; it is often used to refer to the Quadi, who established a kingdom—the Suevian Kingdom—in northwestern Spain in the early fifth century. The Alamanni, or Swabians, were evidently descended from the Suevi, in particular, from the Semnones.

References in periodicals archive ?
He traces the tradition to the Germanic invaders of the Iberian Peninsula, the Suevi and Vandals and the various forms of the name "Hellequin" to their Germanic root, Helle, the realm of the dead.
Whatever it is, the most important is that the year 476AD hardly ended when there were six gothic kingdoms on the lands of the fallen empire, and these kingdoms are: the kingdom of Odovacerin Italy, the kingdom of Vandals in the south of Africa, the kingdom of western Goths that extended from Loire to The Strait of Gibraltar, the kingdom of Bergndien in The Rhone Valley and Sawon, the state of Europeanizes on Maizand Malzoland the down Rhine, and lastly the smallest gothic kingdom which is "suevi" in the areas known now as Portugal and Galicia.
The invasions of 376 and 405-406 are not to be attributed to periodic incursions by tribal Tervingi and Greuthungi, Vandals, Alans, and Suevi. Those inroads were merely epiphenomena of a much larger and far more serious thirty-five-year-long mass migration caused by the advance of the Huns westward and southward, a gigantic demographic shift that drove other barbarians scurrying ahead into Roman territory--putting enormous pressures on tenuous Roman defenses along the Rhine and Danube.
On the exile of four thousand monks, see Isidore of Seville, History of the Goths, Vandals and Suevi 78, trans.
Tacitus thought that the Suevi were characterised by their distinctive, knotted, hair.
Visigoths, Burgundians, Franks, Suevi and Vandals were all settled as federates on large tracts of Gaul and Spain, and were evolving into Germanic kingdoms under only the most nominal Roman overlordship.