Suffragettes


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Suffragettes

 

women participants in the movement to obtain voting rights for women. The movement gained prominence in Great Britain, the USA, Germany, and several other countries in the second half of the 19th and the early 20th century. The suffragettes, particularly in Great Britain, made wide use of obstructive tactics and noisy demonstrations. In 1904 an international organization was founded—the International Women Suffrage Alliance, which in 1946 became the International Alliance of Women—Equal Rights—Equal Responsibilities. Lacking the support of working women, the suffragette movement was bourgeois in nature and had no widespread political results. The movement came to an end after World War I, when women in a number of countries won the right to vote as a result of the revolutionary struggle of the working people.

References in periodicals archive ?
Emma Sproson Lloyd was a leading member of the suffragette movement.
"The Suffragettes - they represent the idea of resistance to hierarchies of privilege, in this case the institutional privilege of men over women.
The Scottish Suffragette Cities Project, led by RGU communication and media professor Sarah Pederson, reveals the lengths women went to to fight for the right to vote in the area between 1867 and 1918.
Richard Edmonds, principal auctioneer at Chippenham Auction Rooms, said: "There's no doubt that suffragettes are hot right now.
"Suffragette Planners and Plotters" is the first study to give the Pethick-Lawrences the recognition that their part in the fight for the vote deserves, shedding new light on the development of the militant campaign.
"The suffragettes were so-called due to their militant approach to the fight for women's suffrage.
There has been much debate about her intentions - did she intend to kill herself or was she attempting to attach a suffragette scarf to the horse's bridle?
"While we had suffragist collections in Wales, and an example of anti-suffragette sentiment in Wales, until now we had very little in our collections relating to the Welsh suffragettes themselves.
It is this disturbing force-feeding equipment, used on suffragettes at Walton Gaol (now HMP Liverpool) which museum visitors can now see.
Join historian Jill Liddington to walk in the footsteps of local suffragettes as well as the visit in 1906 of suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst who addressed packed meetings in the town.