tabernacle

(redirected from Sukkah)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to Sukkah: Sukkot

Tabernacle

(tăb`ərnăk'əl), in the Bible, the portable holy place of the Hebrews during their desert wanderings. It was a tent, like the portable tent-shrines used by ancient Semites, set up in each camp; eventually it housed the Ark of the Covenant (see arkark,
in the Bible. 1 Boat of Noah, which he built at God's command to preserve his family and certain creatures from the Deluge. 2 Ark of the Covenant, the sacred wooden chest of the Hebrews, representative of God or identified with Him.
..... Click the link for more information.
, (2)). In the Book of Numbers, the Tabernacle is referred to as the "Tent of Meeting" when it functioned as the place for divine revelation to MosesMoses
, Hebrew lawgiver, probably b. Egypt. The prototype of the prophets, he led his people in the 13th cent. B.C. out of bondage in Egypt to the edge of Canaan. The narrative in the Bible is the chief source of information on his life.
..... Click the link for more information.
. The Tabernacle rested in ShilohShiloh
, town, central ancient Palestine, the modern Khirbet Seilun, the West Bank, NNE of Jerusalem. In biblical times it lay in the territory of Ephraim. The Hebrews were, apparently, the first to build extensively on the site.
..... Click the link for more information.
 before it was finally placed in Jerusalem. DavidDavid,
d. c.970 B.C., king of ancient Israel (c.1010–970 B.C.), successor of Saul. The Book of First Samuel introduces him as the youngest of eight sons who is anointed king by Samuel to replace Saul, who had been deemed a failure.
..... Click the link for more information.
 kept the Ark of the Covenant inside it. During SolomonSolomon,
d. c.930 B.C., king of the ancient Hebrews (c.970–c.930 B.C.), son and successor of David. His mother was Bath-sheba. His accession has been dated to c.970 B.C. According to the Bible.
..... Click the link for more information.
's reign, the Tabernacle was replaced by the Temple as a sign that God had given his people rest from their wandering. The term is also applied to the small receptacle, used in the Roman Catholic Church, in which the Host in the ciborium is reserved on the altar.

Tabernacle

A freestanding ornamental canopy above an altar, tomb, or ornamental niche.

tabernacle

tabernacle, 1
1. A decorative niche often topped with a canopy and housing a statue.
2. A church for a large Protestant congregation.

tabernacle

1. Old Testament
a. the portable sanctuary in the form of a tent in which the ancient Israelites carried the Ark of the Covenant (Exodus 25--27)
b. the Jewish Temple regarded as the shrine of the divine presence
2. Judaism an English word for sukkah
3. a meeting place for worship used by Mormons or Nonconformists
4. a small ornamented cupboard or box used for the reserved sacrament of the Eucharist
5. the human body regarded as the temporary dwelling of the soul
6. Chiefly RC Church a canopied niche or recess forming the shrine of a statue
7. Nautical a strong framework for holding the foot of a mast stepped on deck, allowing it to be swung down horizontally to pass under low bridges, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is only fulfilled if you welcome to you sukkah a large group of neighbors, relatives, kids, and friends, to join you under the fragility of this roof.
Most of the guests actually ate inside the museum, but about 240 guests ate in the sukkah.
In a bid to revive the holiday, American writer Joshua Foer held a sukkah design competition.
The inspiration for this "anti-monument," as I have already noted earlier, comes from two concepts in the Bible and the Talmud: the Sabbatical Year (shmita) in which all agricultural work ceases and financial debts are suspended; and the sukkah, a temporary, rickety structure in which religious Jews dwell for seven days during the Feast of Tabernacles.
The metaphor of home permeates the images whether they are of the sukkah, of doves flying to their cote, or the wooden structure within which the images are housed.
A Sukkah is used to commemorate the biblical story of how Jews came to the Holy Land from Egypt after a 40-year desert sojourn.
The sukkah is a reminder to us all of the tenuous nature of human life.
Now they can construct the sukkah, the traditional open-air holiday structure where religious Jews have meals and welcome guests ("ushpizin" is Aramaic for guests).
10) They include blowing and hearing the shofar (at Rosh Hashanah), and taking the lulav and dwelling in the sukkah (at Sukkot).
In one case, the Court declared that a condominium association in Montreal could not bar a group of Orthodox Jewish families from constructing temporary sukkah huts on their balconies to celebrate the fall festival of Sukkot.
In our evening prayers throughout the year, just as we prepare to lie down in vulnerable sleep, we plead with God, "Spread over us Your sukkah of shalom--of peace and safety.
The court held that the officials did not interfere with the inmate's Sukkot observance by failing to provide a Sukkah booth in the prison yard, but that fact issues remained as to whether the denial was due to security concerns or was merely a pretext for interfering with the inmate's right to freely exercise his religion.