Sullivanesque

Sullivanesque

A term descriptive of the architectural style and decorative designs of Louis H. Sullivan (1856–1924), an important figure in the development of modern functional architecture. He is known for his famous statement that “Form ever follows function, ” and is especially noted for his tripartite scheme for the design of tall buildings. This term is also applied to his continuous foliated motifs, which are somewhat Art Nouveau in character.
References in periodicals archive ?
The original eclectic exterior of the building, described as the Queen Anne style with Richardsonian Romanesque and Sullivanesque relief ornamentation, had round turrets on three of the building s corners.
The plot zips by in an explosion of witty musical numbers and knicker-flashing dance routines, including the tongue-in-cheek romantic duet, Serious, and the snortingly funny Gilbert and Sullivanesque courtroom piece, There
Notably, in Saarinen's entry, there was an observable Sullivanesque expressiveness.
Sullivanesque ornament in the South: Henry John Klutho
And it did just that, as Edna all too soon ditched the audience banter to deliver her own tribute to her homeland Australia; a musical journey from Creation to the present day complete with soaring choir, Gilbert & Sullivanesque themes and place name patter song.
Only a true Savoyard would be likely to distinguish Roger Neill's Sullivanesque pastiche of ballads, recitatives and patter songs from the real thing.
It is certainly quintessential G and S, full of Sullivanesque musical inspiration and Gilbertian absurdities.
I trust these women's views and prefer them to the An drew Sullivanesque hand wringing over tying the knot.
Calamy demonstrates a Sullivanesque understanding of physics when, towards the end of the novel, he explains to Mary Thriplow that his hand comprises
Huxley's rejection of a Sullivanesque Weltanschauung led him to conceive the final chapter of Point Counter Point as a head to head confrontation between Rampion and Spandrell over the meaning of Beethoven's string quartet in A minor (Opus 132), perhaps incorporating into his text exchanges between Lawrence and Sullivan which had taken place while both men were his guests in Italy.
Even Simon Cowell's getting into the act with "America's Got Talent," the Ed Sullivanesque variety show-competition that bows this week on NBC.