Mehmed II

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Mehmed II

 

known as Fatih (“the conqueror”). Born Mar. 30, 1432, in Edirne (Adrianople); died Apr. 3 (or May 3), 1481, in Hunkârçiri. Turkish sultan (reigned 1444; 1451–81).

Mehmed II conducted a policy of conquest and personally headed the campaigns of the Turkish Army. In 1453 he conquered Constantinople and made it the capital of the Ottoman Empire, thereby putting an end to Byzantium. Mehmed’s reign also saw the annexation of Serbia (1459), the conquest of Morea (1460), the Trabzon (Trebizond) Empire (1461), Bosnia (1463), and the island of Euboea (1471), the completion of the conquest of Albania (1479), and the subjugation of the Crimean Khanate (1475). The first law code of the Ottoman Empire was compiled under Mehmed II.

References in periodicals archive ?
Mihailovic portrays Sultan Mehmet II as a deceitful ruler who constantly reneges on promises made to other rulers; he is also portrayed as unpredictable as he beheads one king but allows another to live following battles against him.
It was converted into a mosque after Sultan Mehmet II (The Conquerer) conquered Istanbul in 1453.
As for Venice, her foreign policy throughout a long and profitable history might be summarized as "Make money, not war." But when the twenty-three-year-old Sultan Mehmet II, known as Fatih ("the Conqueror"), seized Greece and Bosnia, the Venetians were more or less forced to go to war.
On Tuesday, 29 May 1453, Constantinople fell to the besieging army of Sultan Mehmet II. Constantine XI, the last Byzantine emperor, charged hopeless, defiant and screaming into the Ottoman masses.
The victorious Sultan Mehmet II, who bestowed on himself the title of Kayser-I-Rum (Caesar of Rome), pressed on into the Balkans on his way to the creation of a new world empire on the Roman model.
1460); received sporadic assistance from Naples and Venice; his success was limited by clan jealousies, and Sultan Mehmet II concluded a ten-year truce with him (1461); broke the truce to attack the Turks, at the instigation of Pope Pius II, in alliance with the Venetians and Hungarians (1463?); successfully resisted a siege of his stronghold at Kruge (1466); traveled to Rome to seek aid from Pope Paul II (1467), but died on his way back to Albania at Alessio (January 17, 1468); the Turks swiftly reconquered Albania following his death, except for Kruge, which he had willed to Venice.
The pirates, sent by Sultan Mehmet II, conqueror of ystanbul, ravaged the area.
Sultan Mehmet II officially recognised Patriarch Gennadius II as leader of the Orthodox peoples throughout the Ottoman Empire following the capture of Constantinople in 1453.
The last mention of Troy in historic records is in 1462 when the Ottoman sultan Mehmet II, having seized Constantinople nine years previously, visited the site to plant his footsteps on history.
It was the first Rome, and its satellite Kingdoms in the Levant, that left the second so weakened that it could not resist the forces of the Ottoman Sultan Mehmet II -- when in 1453 they stormed the walls of Constantinople.
Sultan Mehmet II had an edifice erected devoted to the trading of textiles.