Sumba


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Sumba

or

Soemba

(both: so͞om`bä), island (1990 pop. 444,777), 4,305 sq mi (11,150 sq km), Indonesia, one of the Lesser Sundas, in the Indian Ocean, S of Flores across Sumba Strait. The chief town and port is Waingapu. The island is noted for horse breeding. Formerly Sumba was known as Sandalwood Island because of its large exports (17th–19th cent.) of sandalwood. The island was first visited by Europeans in 1522 and passed to the direct control of the Dutch in 1866.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Sumba

 

an island of the Lesser Sunda group in Indonesia. Area, 11,200 sq km. Population, 290,000 (1971).

Sumba’s southern and central regions have rugged low-mountain relief, with elevations reaching 1,225 m. The mountains are composed of volcanic and crystalline rocks, with overlying Neogene marls and limestones. The northern part of the island consists of an alluvial plain. Sumba has a rainy tropical climate, with annual precipitation ranging from 1,500 mm on the plain to 2,500 mm in the mountains. The dry season is from July through October. Secondary thin forests predominate, as well as savannas with some species of Australian flora. The mountains have evergreen forests. Copra is produced and coffee, tobacco, soybeans, and peanuts are grown. The chief city is Waingapu.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Sumba

, Soemba
an island in Indonesia, in the Lesser Sunda Islands, separated from Flores by the Sumba Strait: formerly important for sandalwood exports. Pop.: 355 073 (1990). Area: 11 153 sq. km (4306 sq. miles)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
While protesting the decision by the games' management to scale down their quota, Sumba said that they had invested over Sh25 million in the team to have them prepare and train well for the African games.
Sumba Island Beach Management Unit chairman Francis Mukudi said the fishermen were casting their nets in Lake Victoria at 10am when the officers attacked.
A total of 229 head of cattle including Simmental Purebred (n = 19), Simmental Crossbred (n = 27), Ongole Grade (n = 27), Bali (n = 20), Pesisir (n = 13), Holstein Friesian (n = 20), Sumba Ongole (n = 38), Madura (n = 20), Banteng (n = 20), and Pasundan cattle (n = 25) were used for blood sampling.
Hoskins (2004:92) explores the connections between bridal status, slaves and other gifts in Sumba and proposes that marriage prestations are important phenomena in the making of free women, who are so recognized because they have ancestors and forebearers whom the wife-takers must honour with mandatory gifts.
TUCKED away on one of Indonesia's most unexplored islands, Nihi Sumba Island hotel is a luxury resort with a conscience.
Scheduled on the 10th day of the month are the Green Run and Sumba, Interpretative Dance, Star of the Road, Mamita (Senior Citizen) and Binibining Paranaque pageant.
Youness Jabbour (iD), (1,2) Hamza Lamchahab, (1,2) Sumba Harrison, (1,2) Hafsa El Ouazzani, (1,3) Tarik Karmouni, (1,2) Khalid El Khader, (1,2) Abdellatif Koutani, (1,2) and Ahmed Iben Attya Andaloussi (1,2)
The GHSS would be constructed with an estimated cost of 50 million rupees, Murtaza told the gathering and announced construction of PCC roads from Sumba Thara to Gohra would cost of 7.5 million rupees.
'I had just come back from spending six months in Indonesia on the island of Sumba. I had decided to become an explorer and was writing a book on the island's megalithic sculpture.
(49) The more refined and valuable Indian textiles were often less in demand than the so-called 'ordinary cloth' mainly of cotton textiles from as far afield as India, but mainly from the islands of Java, Sumbawa (including Bima in the eastern part of the island), Sumba, and perhaps even Rote, Sabu, Timor, and other islands in Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT, Eastern Lesser Sunda Islands)--all of which had weaving traditions.
Isaac Sumba Maly, who runs the Palma Okapi Tours travel agency, says he is preparing for a visit by Chinese tourists.