sun cross


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sun cross

[′sən ‚krȯs]
(meteorology)
A rare halo phenomenon in which bands of white light intersect over the sun at right angles; it appears probable that most of such observed crosses appear merely as a result of the superposition of a parhelic circle and a sun pillar.
References in periodicals archive ?
The logo submitted with the application was a white supremacist version of the Celtic Cross, called a "wheel cross" or "sun cross".
This tale evoked peals of laughter, and over the clink of glasses, we watched the sun cross the Lake, hues of crimson and purple spreading in the sky.
The equaliser came after Keegan's triple-substitution gamble 19 minutes from time, with the most controversial new arrival Antoine Sibierski proving to be the perfect replacement for crowd favourite Joey Barton when he rose to power a Jihai Sun cross into the net.
It's not often that the moon and sun cross paths during the Earth's orbit, but on Sunday skywatchers from the Pacific to the Atlantic were set to get an eyeful of a solar event during the Ring of Fire eclipse.
The moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator and equalizes night and day is calculated exactly every year, and families gather together to observe the rituals.
The March equinox marks the moment the sun crosses the imaginary equator from south to north and vice versa in September.
At the March equinox, also called the vernal equinox, the Sun crosses from south to north of the celestial equator.
"At NESD 2018, for the first time in our history, we will dip within hours of the exact moment the sun crosses the celestial equator.
Daybreak comes early, and anglers targeting larger-than-slot, 20-inch plus, spotted seatrout can beat the heat by getting out in the dark, fishing as the sun crosses the horizon.
The spring season begins with the vernal equinox around March 21 when the sun crosses the equator.
The Spring, or March, Vernal Equinox is the moment the sun crosses the celestial equator -- the imaginary line in the sky above the Earth's equator -- from south to north.