Castniidae

(redirected from Sun moth)

Castniidae

[‚kast′nī·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The castniids; large diurnal, butterflylike moths composing the single, small family of the lepidopteran superfamily Castnioidea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Richter A, Weinhold D, Robertson G, Young M, Edwards T, Hnatiuk S and Osborne W (2013) More than an empty case: a non invasive technique for monitoring the Australian critically endangered golden sun moth, Synemon plana (Lepidoptera: Castniidae).
It will help improve habitat for the nationally endangered golden sun moth, striped legless lizard, superb parrot and yellow box-Blakelys red gum grassy woodland.
Clive's environmental achievements are many and include campaigning to protect the Little Desert National Park and the establishment of the Nhill Sun Moth Reserve.
In this issue of the journal we are able to do it twice in widely different environments, with papers focusing on the sun moth in New South Wales and crawling medusa in coastal Victoria.
Other sun moth species which occur in NSW include Synemon collecta (grassy woodlands on the northern tablelands), Synemon jcaria (mallee woodland in central inland NSW), Synemon magnifica (open sandstone areas on the coast and ranges), Synemon plana (native grassland on the southern tablelands) and an undescribed Synemon species (Snowy Mountains) (O'Dwyer and Attiwill 1999; Douglas 2003; Zborowski and Edwards 2007; Richter et al.
Dunn KL (1996) Territorial and oviposition behaviour in the sun moth Synemon laeta Walk.
New TR, Gibson L and Van Praagh BD (2007) The golden sun moth Synemon plana (Castniidae) on Victoria's remnant southern native grasslands.
O'Dwyer C and Attiwill PM (1999) A comparative study of habitats of the golden sun moth Synemon plana Walker (Lepidoptera: Castniidae): implications for restoration.
Richter A, Osborne W, Hnatiuk S and Rowell A (2013) Moths in fragments: insights into the biology and ecology of the Australian endangered golden sun moth Synemon plana (Lepidoptera: Castniidae) in natural temperate and exotic grassland remnants.
The sun moths generally flew within about a 15 m radius of this area before returning to settle again within a few metres.
The site fidelity by perching sun moths seen at site 1 in the Pilliga forest is in contrast to the behaviour described by Dunn (1996), where disturbed sun moths settled 10 m or more from their original perch.
Gibson L and New TR (2007) Problems in studying populations of the golden sun moth, Synemon plana (Lepidoptera: Castniidae) in south-eastern Australia.