sun-synchronous orbit

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sun-synchronous orbit

[′sən ¦siŋ·krə·nəs ′ȯr·bət]
(aerospace engineering)
An earth orbit of a spacecraft so that the craft is always in the same direction relative to that of the sun; as a result, the spacecraft passes over the equator at the same spots at the same times.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following the separation of EMISAT, the vehicles fourth stage engines were restarted twice to place the 28 international customer satellites precisely into a sun-synchronous orbit of 504 km height.
In our recent study (Vondrak and Ron, 2017) we proved that better fit is obtained when empirical prograde annual Sun-Synchronous Correction, introduced by Mathews et al.
Unlike Diwata-1, which has irregular interval of its passes on a specific spot, the sun-synchronous orbit of Diwata-2 allows it to return to the same spot and take its images in a more periodic way, Perez said.
Chinese Long March-2C rockets are mainly used to send satellites into low Earth or Sun-synchronous orbits.
Developed by the China Academy of Space Technology based on China's CAST 2000 satellite module, the Pakistan Remote Sensing Satellite 1 is expected to work in a sun-synchronous orbit for at least seven years.
It will operate in sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 640km.
He added that the satellite will be launched at 610 km sun-synchronous orbit in July, 2018.
It will be launched at 610 km sun-synchronous orbit in July 2018, he said and also shared the picture of the satellite's model.
PakTES-1A, an indigenously developed 285 kg Remote Sensing Satellite (RSS) of Pakistan will be launched at 610 km sun-synchronous orbit in July 2018.
The first image in high resolution shows a part of Indore, about 200 km from Bhopal in central India."As one of our earth's observatory in the Cartosat-2 series, the spacecraft has become operational after it was injected into a sun-synchronous orbit at 505 km above the earth," said Karnik.
Chinese philosopher and scientist who has been credited as the first person ever to conduct optical experiments, the 600kilogram-plus satellite was sent into a sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 500 kilometers on Aug.
Singling out Saxa Vord on the north of Unst, the northernmost island in the Shetland archipelago, the report states: "The site offering the maximum payload mass to orbit is Saxa Vord in the Shetlands, from where direct launch is possible to both SSO (Sun-Synchronous) and polar orbits."