Sunda Islands


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Sunda Islands

(sŭn`də), mainly in Indonesia, between the South China Sea and the Indian Ocean, comprising the western part of the Malay ArchipelagoMalay Archipelago,
great island group of SE Asia, formerly called the East Indies. Lying between the Asian mainland and Australia, and separating the Pacific Ocean from the Indian Ocean, it includes Brunei, Indonesia, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, East Timor, and E Malaysia.
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. It includes two main groups: the Greater Sunda Islands, to which belong the largest islands of Borneo, Sumatra, Java, and Sulawesi; and the Lesser Sundas, which lie E of Java and include Sumbawa, Flores, Timor, and Sumba (the largest islands). Bali and Lombok, although smaller, are the most important of the Lesser Sundas. The Lesser Sundas, which were renamed Nusa Tenggara [southeastern islands] in 1954, form two provinces within Indonesia. Malaysia, Brunei, and East Timor are the other nations wholly or partially in the Sunda Islands. The Sunda Strait, 20 to 65 mi (32–100 km) wide, between Java and Sumatra, connects the Java Sea with the Indian Ocean.

Sunda Islands

 

a group of islands, the principal part of the Malay (Indonesian) Archipelago. They are divided into the Greater Sunda Islands and the Lesser Sunda Islands. Total area, approximately 1.4 million sq km. Except for the northern part of the island of Kalimantan, most of which is part of Malaysia, and the eastern part of the island of Timor, which is a possession of Portugal, the Sunda Islands are part of Indonesia.

References in periodicals archive ?
A survey of the mosses of the Lesser Sunda Islands (Nusa Tenggara), Indonesia.
Recently, the first authentic member of the genus to be described from the Oriental region, Phrynus exsul Harvey 2002, was named from specimens collected from Flores Island in the Lesser Sunda Islands (Harvey 2002).
The species may be more widely distributed within the Lesser Sunda Islands.
At some time, most likely between the arrival of the first Portuguese in the eastern Lesser Sunda Islands and 1873, a new word entered the lexicon of Sara Sikka, the language of Sikka.
Either a Sikkanese Christian or European missionary translated the name of God from the language of another Christianized community in the eastern Lesser Sunda Islands into Sara Sikka (the language of Sikka);
The word was used in Sikka in a context other than Christian belief and practice before the arrival of Europeans in the eastern Lesser Sunda Islands and was then adapted to denote the Christian God.
* Philippines * Gulf of Guinea Islands * Sunda islands (Indonesia) * Southern Mascarene islands (near Madagascar) * Eastern South Africa * Northern Indian Ocean * Southern Japan, Taiwan and southern China * Cape Verde Islands * Western Caribbean * Red Sea and Gulf of Aden
Moluccan emphasis on ritualized hunting is quite sharply contrasted to a more domesticated sacrificial emphasis the lesser Sunda islands of which Timor, Flores and Samba are a part.
| WHERE is the smallest of the Greater Sunda Islands? | WHEN did Hugh Capet become King of France?
It also maps the stranger-king myths in the broader Lesser Sunda islands. The second part provides the text of the integrated Hikayat Kerajaan Sikka based on the Kondi and Pareira texts, as well as an additional section on the 'rajadom' of Sikka in the early twentieth century composed by the author.
The section on provenance is a detailed study of colonial knowledge-formation and education, and the ways they influenced local historical knowledge production in the Lesser Sunda islands. The authors of the manuscript straddled the colonial administrative and the traditional Sikka socio-political hierarchies.
Noting the differences between the European model and the Indic models, he poses the question, 'what about the rulers on the margins of the margins of Indic influence, and those who eventually came under the colonial regime of a European power, such as the people of Sikka?' Taking this further, he argues that contrary to assumptions commonly held for the Lesser Sunda Islands, there was no diarchy (of the ritual and secular) in Sikka society, and this institution and practice would not have been a common feature of societies in the Lesser Sunda islands.