Sunnism


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Sunnism

 

the principal and orthodox sect of Islam. The adherents of Sunnism, known as Sunnites or Sunni Muslims, constitute the majority of Muslim believers, except in Iran, in southern Iraq, in the Yemen Arab Republic, and in Soviet Azerbaijan and Soviet Upland Tadzhikistan. In resolving the question of who is the imam or caliph (leader) of the Muslim community, Sunnism depends formally upon “the consent of the whole community,” in contrast to Shiism, which recognizes only Ali and his direct descendants as imams or caliphs. There are four religious and juridical doctrines (madhabib) in Sunnism. Mecca and Medina are the holy cities of the Sunnites.

References in periodicals archive ?
In his speech two days ago, Secretary General of the Lebanese Hezbollah Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah noted that the balance of popular support between the March 8 forces - the code name of political Shiism represented by the party - and the March 14 forces - the code name of political Sunnism represented by the Future Movement - will remain unchanged for the next hundred years, concluding that both sides should offer concessions to exit this predicament.
As his logic accepts or rejects democracy according to those demanding it, it has dire consequences starting with the acceptance of exceptions within democracy, which may affect the Muslim Brotherhood itself by stigmatising it with an abhorrent sectarianism and a bias towards an oppressive minority due to is Sunnism.
They have been accused of spreading their Shiite beliefs, holding Sunnism in contempt, insulting the four rightly guided caliphs, receiving funding from abroad to propagate their sect in Egypt and attract new converts.
To start with, the Houthis are believers in Zaydi Shiism, a branch of Islam that often appears closer to Sunnism, but with some important distinctions.
But in truth his greatest achievements lay elsewhere, and that was in his restoration of Sunnism in Egypt," says Azzam.
Their quiescence and subordination to Sunnism is over!
His persistent efforts to establish a fifth official Muslim law school--however well meaning in its desire to bridge the gaps between Sunnism and Shi'ism--certainly won little support within Iran.
The Saudi government worked closely with Wahhabi ulema to build a network of seminaries, mosques, schools, activists, writers and journalists to emphasize Sunni identity, push it in the direction of militant Wahhabism, drive a wedge between Sunnism and Shiism and eliminate Iran's ideological influence.
The trend might also signal a shift in the centuries-old public perception about the respective merits of Shiism and Sunnism. For centuries Sunnis have been the stronger communities in the Muslim world and usually the rulers, while the Shi'a have been weaker and usually the ruled.
"The Origins of al Qaeda's Ideology: Implications for US Strategy" details the origins of Sunnism and the personalities responsible for morphing it into the current militant form exemplified by the likes of al Qaeda.
First, Gregorian lays the background knowledge of Islam by presenting Prophet Muhammad as the messenger of Allah, the origin of Qur'an, the formation and the spread of Islam, and the conflicts in Islam leading to the diversities of Sunnism, Shiism, and Sufism.
Its split with Sunnism relates to a dispute over who was the proper successor to Mohammed, not to differing degrees of theological rigidity or piety.