superacid

(redirected from Superacids)

superacid

[¦sü·pər′as·əd]
(chemistry)
An acidic medium that has a proton-donating ability equal to or greater than 100% sulfuric acid.
A solution of acetic or phosphoric acid.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Apparently, both SZ and SZA are solid superacids for the Hammett acidity function H0 a$?
Brei, "Superacids based on zirconium dioxide," Theoretical and Experimental Chemistry, vol.
[81] investigated the solubility of SWNTs obtained by different methods of production in superacids (e.g., fuming sulfuric and chlorosulfonic acids) and showed that high concentrations (>100 mg/mL) of SWNTs are spontaneously dispersed in acids within minutes.
and Arata, K.: 1994, Determination of acid strength of solid superacids by temperature programmed desorption using pyridine.
In his case, though, he is focused on the cationic polymerization of soybean oil with superacids, such as triflic acid (CF3S03H) and tetrafluoroboric acid (HBF4).
The 2008 edition has been revised to reflect new areas of interest, such as superacids and bioinorganic chemistry.
Good solvents for (stable) dispersion of modest concentrations of SWNTs are limited to anhydrous superacids (21), which is not easily amenable to low-cost manufacturing of polymer composites.
Patent 7,863,402 (January 4, 2011), "Organic Superacids, Polymers Derived From Organic Superacids, and Methods of Making and Using the Same," Tenneille Weston Capehart, Gail Capehart, Gerhard Maier, Claude Spino, Thomas J.
THE ROLE OF SUPERACIDS IN CATALYTIC CRACKING OF OLEIC ACID
Although the chemistry of carboranes as anions has a relatively long (ca 40 years) history, the first actual carborane-based "weighable and measurable" superacids (i.e., conjugate acids of carborane anions) were synthesized and liberated by Reed and coworkers in 2000 [7-9].
in 1962, Olah discovered that powerful superacids, trillions of times stronger than pure sulfuric acid, could capture fast-disappearing "carbocations" and stabilize them for hours.
A round of jellied superacids could destroy the optics of heavily armored vehicles, penetrate glass, or silently destroy key weapons systems.