supercontinent

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supercontinent

a great landmass thought to have existed in the geological past and to have split into smaller landmasses, which drifted and formed the present continents
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

supercontinent

[′sü·pər‚känt·ən·ənt]
(geology)
A large continental mass, such as Pangea, that existed early in geologic time and from which smaller continents formed and separated by fragmentation and drifting.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
These plates move around at speeds of about 5cm per year - and eventually this movement brings all the continents together and forms what is known as a supercontinent.
"Ongoing research by our team shows that this mountain belt, in contrast to the Himalayas, would not have been very high, suggesting the final continental assembling process that led to the formation of the supercontinent Nuna was not a hard collision like India's recent collision with Asia," Zheng-Xiang Li, a professor at the university and coauthor on (https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/gsa/geology/article-abstract/526080/laurentian-crust-in-northeast-australia?redirectedFrom=fulltext) the paper , said in the statement.
After that, because of plate tectonics, Rodinia broke up and formed the supercontinent Pangaea.
We once thought Earth was one giant supercontinent on only one occasion--and we were wrong then, too, as proven by Ohio Univ.
But as the ROM prepares to take visitors millions of years back in time to the supercontinent of Gondwana, we are doing just that.
Geologic evidence points to the creation of at least one pre-Rodinia supercontinent near the end of the Palaeoproterozoic era.
The motion of tectonic plates continually rearranges Earth's continents, sometimes cramming most or all of them into immense groupings called supercontinents.
Condie, K.C., 1998, Episodic continental growth and supercontinents: a mantle avalanche connection?: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v.
Rodinia is the precursor of Pangea, and both supercontinents fragmented into smaller chunks by tectonic plate movements.
The world got closer to what it is today through the formation of several "supercontinents," or the largest landmasses of a given time period.