Superior


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Superior,

city (1990 pop. 27,134), seat of Douglas co., NW Wis., on Superior Bay of Lake Superior, at the mouths of the St. Louis and the Nemadji rivers; inc. 1883. It is a port of entry with many rail lines. The natural harbor, shared with Duluth, Minn., has some of the nation's largest coal and ore docks; copper, limestone, and grain are also shipped. Superior has shipyards, flour milling, an oil refinery, and wood and machinery manufacture. Tourists are attracted to the surrounding scenic features. The area was visited by the French explorers Radisson (1661) and Duluth (1679). The city grew after iron ore was discovered (1880s) in the Gogebic range. The Univ. of Wisconsin at Superior is there.

Superior

 

a city in the northern United States, in the state of Wisconsin; a southeastern suburb of Duluth. Population, 32,000 (1970; 265,000, including the Duluth metropolitan area). Superior is a port at the western end of Lake Superior. It is a major shipping center for iron ore and wheat. Industries include the production of lumber, flour milling, and shipbuilding.

superior

[sə′pir·ē·ər]
(botany)
Positioned above another organ or structure.
Referring to a calyx that is attached to the ovary.
Referring to an ovary that is above the insertion of the floral parts.

superior

1. Astronomy
a. (of a planet) having an orbit further from the sun than the orbit of the earth
b. (of a conjunction) occurring when the sun lies between the earth and an inferior planet
2. (of a plant ovary) situated above the calyx and other floral parts
3. Anatomy (of one part in relation to another) situated above or higher
4. the head of a community in a religious order

Superior

Lake. a lake in the N central US and S Canada: one of the largest freshwater lakes in the world and westernmost of the Great Lakes. Area: 82 362 sq. km (31 800 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Anatomically and technically, the superior turbinate has been the least accessible and most neglected of the turbinates.
Moreover, a superior with an unattractive style would probably be viewed as a more difficult target of influence than a superior with an attractive style.
Physician executives' preferences for compliance-gaining strategies were measured by asking them how likely they would be to select the strategies of reason, bargaining, friendliness, assertiveness, coalition, and higher-authority (see figure 1, right) in influencing a superior who typically communicated with them in an attractive or in an unattractive style.

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