gyrus

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gyrus

[′jī·rəs]
(anatomy)
One of the convolutions (ridges) on the surface of the cerebrum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, a decrease in white matter was also found in our OCD patients in two temporo-parietal regions: the right angular gyrus and the right superior temporal gyrus.
The significant regions are the postcentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, insula, inferior parietal lobule, transverse temporal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, and inferior semilunar lobule in the grey matter and the postcentral gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, precentral gyrus, subgyrus, middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, cuneus, and middle occipital gyrus in the white matter (Figure 6).
Memorization: Areas of activation were observed in the medial frontal gyrus (BA10), the superior frontal gyrus (BA8) of the left hemisphere, the inferior frontal gyrusa(BA47), the superior temporal gyrus (BA22) and the medial tenporal gyrus (BA21).
Scientists found that while kids use their prefrontal cortexes to do math, adults use a part of their brains called the superior temporal gyrus.
But by the time kids become adults, that region takes a backseat when crunching numbers, and another part of the brain, called the left superior temporal gyrus, kicks in.
But when patients had both increased age and OSA, decreased brain activation was noted, compared with younger patients, specifically in the right superior temporal gyrus and anterior cingulate, and in the bilateral parahip-pocampal gyri, caudate, precuneus, cerebellum, and fusiform gyrus, said Dr.
Follow-up MRI obtained on the 30th day after the onset of symptoms demonstrated a reduction in the volume of the lesion, as well as image characteristics typical of a cavernous angioma located immediately adjacent to Heschl's convolution in the left superior temporal gyrus (figure 2).
Wernicke's area includes parts of the supramarginal and angular gyri in the parietal lobe and the superior temporal gyrus in the temporal lobe.
In Geschwind's model the grammatical and lexical representations of language arise in the superior temporal gyrus (Wernicke's area) of the LH, and these representations are transformed via a band of association fibers that course around the sylvian lip through the angular gyrus and into the frontal lobe, terminating in the third frontal convolution of the LH (Broca's Area).
Vertiginous seizures result from stimulation of the superior temporal gyrus.

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