supersonic transport

(redirected from Supersonic travel)
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Related to Supersonic travel: Supersonic Flight

supersonic transport:

see airplaneairplane,
 aeroplane,
or aircraft,
heavier-than-air vehicle, mechanically driven and fitted with fixed wings that support it in flight through the dynamic action of the air.
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.

supersonic transport

[¦sü·pər¦sän·ik ′tranz‚pȯrt]
(aerospace engineering)
A transport plane capable of flying at speeds higher than the speed of sound. Abbreviated SST.
References in periodicals archive ?
Concorde was an outdated notion of prestige that left sheer speed the only luxury of supersonic travel.
"Whether pioneering supersonic travel or better connecting our countries through the Channel Tunnel, co-operation between our nations has produced radical innovation.
"Whether pioneering supersonic travel or better connecting our countries through the Channel Tunnel, co-operation between our nations has produced radical innovation." In the past Johnson has raised the idea of building another channel tunnel to consolidate the relationship between the two countries when Britain leaves the EU.
Supersonic travel, however, is banned by federal law in the United States.
COULD we be heading for a new era of supersonic travel - 13 years after Concorde last flew?
Could we heading for a new era of supersonic travel - 13 years after Concorde last flew?
In alarmingly direct fashion, Morton opens with two questions: 'Do you believe the risks of climate change merit serious action aimed at lessening them?' and 'Do you think that reducing an industrial economy's carbon-dioxide emissions to near zero is very hard?' He then examines the context in which these challenges have arisen, from the discovery of the stratosphere to the beginnings of supersonic travel and the nuclear tests of the Cold War.
"Developing, building and flight testing a quiet supersonic X-plane is the next logical step in our path to enabling the industry's decision to open supersonic travel for the flying public," said Jaiwon Shin, associate administrator for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission.
It lead to the deaths of 113 people and hastened the end of luxury supersonic travel.
But in April 2003, Air France and British Airways announced they were retiring the aircraft, citing low passenger numbers following the crash and the September 11 terrorist attacks, and rising maintenance costs for the demise of supersonic travel. But Concorde still has its supporters.
PONTOISE: Continental Airlines and five men went on trial on Tuesday for their alleged role in the crash of an Air France Concorde that killed 113 people in 2000 and brought an end to an era of luxury supersonic travel.