Suriyothai


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Suriyothai

 

national heroine of Thailand; queen of Ayutthaya.

During a siege of Ayutthaya by Burmese troops in 1549, Suriyothai and one of her daughters donned armor and rode into battle on horseback. Suriyothai perished in battle while saving the life of her husband, King Maha Jakkrapat.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
They also are seemingly frustrated that such a film can do well internationally, while Suriyothai, emblematic of official nationalism and an attempt to portray Thainess, has done poorly overseas, despite editing by Francis Ford Coppola.
With a budget of 35 million baht ($1.1 million), the summer blockbuster has collected 560 million baht ($18.8 million) in Bangkok and major cities, beating the previous nationwide tally of 550 million baht ($18.47 million US) set by the 2001 historical epic "Suriyothai."
The 84-year-old monarch will leave Bangkok in the late afternoon and travel by car to Ayutthaya to pay homage to 16th-century-queen Suriyothai, famed for sacrificing her life to protect her husband, according to an official schedule.
Films like the 1980 Luang Ta about an elderly monk who helps a young boy cope with his first crush, the 2006 Ma Kap Phra, about a group of horse riding monks in Chiang Rai province who are clumsy, wild, and hilariously irreverent, the 2001 box-office hit, Suriyothai, in which a monk is depicted cheering on warriors and actually engaging in battle with Burmese soldiers, and the 2009 Luang Phi Kap Phi Khanun about a swindler turned monk who is enlisted to battle a menacing ghost, all depict monks not only breaking their precepts, but displaying a wide range of, what might seem, inappropriately public and explicit emotions.
While well known and indeed intellectually influential in Thailand, Anderson's critique of Thai political uniqueness cannot compete in its reach or sensual appeal with the filmed historical epics--"The Legend of Suriyothai", "Naresuan", and others--from which some in the country would now have their compatriots learn history; see Hong Lysa, "Does popular history need historians?", Warasan thaikhadi sueksa I, no.
At double the budget of Yukol's previous epic, "Suriyothai" (2001)--later reworked into the Francis Ford Coppola-presented "The Legend of Suriyothai" (2003)--"Naresuan" is also popular entertainment made in the national interest of a land where royalty is treated with the utmost respect.
"The Legend of Suriyothai" opens today at the Bijou Art Cinemas.
(The 1946 nonmusical Rex Harrison version was merely frowned upon.) Around the time of Anna's release, the royal family decided to take the fight one step further: Queen Sirikit tapped one of the country's most famous directors to begin filming a historical epic about the life of legendary 16th-century Queen Suriyothai. A lady-in-waiting and a royal, M.L.
Her birthday is being marked by today's gala world premiere of the most expensive Thai movie ever made, a historical epic called Suriyothai.
To commemorate it another film, called Suriyothai, was made, this time by Thais and for Thais.
Pics, which are still lensing after 30 months, rep a baht-500 million ($13.7 million) sequel of sorts to the prince's 2001 blockbuster "Suriyothai," which remains the highest grosser in Thai cinema history.