Susumu Tonegawa


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Tonegawa, Susumu,

1939–, Japanese molecular biologist, Ph.D. Univ. of California at San Diego, 1969. A member of the Basel Institute for Immunology in Switzerland (1971–81), he became a professor of biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1981. Tonegawa discovered the general principle that underlies the body's ability to produce millions of antibodies from cells that contain a limited amount of genetic material. For his discovery, He was awarded the 1987 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
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"Benjamin's scientific knowledge, leadership skills, experience and business acumen make him a tremendous addition to the Galenea team," asserts Susumu Tonegawa, a cofounder of the company, which is focused on developing drugs to treat central nervous system diseases.
Past recipients include Japanese researcher Susumu Tonegawa, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Van Wolferen recounts the tale of a Japanese scientist, Susumu Tonegawa, who won the 1987 Nobel Prize for medicine.
The Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded to Susumu Tonegawa, a Japanese scientist working at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Perineuronal nets might also help hold memories on a shorter timescale, said MIT neuroscientist Susumu Tonegawa. Perineuronal nets might provide support to nerve cell connections in the days after a memory is first formed.
Susumu Tonegawa, the director of the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Saitama in Japan and lead author of the study said, "Our conclusion is that in retrograde amnesia, past memories may not be erased, but could simply be lost and inaccessible for recall.
"The psychiatrist will talk with a patient suffering from depression and try to make them recall positive memories they have had in the past", said Susumu Tonegawa, director of the RIKEN-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass.
Susumu Tonegawa, the Picower Professor of Biology and Neuroscience, said that this is a critical ability that helps the brain to determine when it needs to take action to defend against a potential threat.
In the new work, MIT scientists led by Susumu Tonegawa go further by transforming a once-negative memory into a pleasant one and a once-positive memory into a bad one.
"This is a critical ability that helps the brain to determine when it needs to take action to defend against a potential threat," said Susumu Tonegawa, the Picower Professor of Biology and Neuroscience and senior author of a paper describing the findings in the January 23 issue of Science.