Sutlers


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Sutlers

 

petty merchants of food and articles used by soldiers, who accompanied the army during marches, exercises, and maneuvers; often, especially in France, they were women.

Sutlers appeared as early as in ancient Greece and Rome but were most widespread in the European feudal armies when there was no centralized army supply. From the 18th century (in the Russian Army from 1716), the rights of sutlers were regulated by special instructions and charters. Sutlers existed until the early 20th century.

References in periodicals archive ?
Duties of the council included determining "the quantity and kind of clothing, small equipments, and soldiers' necessaries, groceries, and all articles which the sutlers may be required to keep on hand; examine the sutler's books and papers, and fix the tariff prices of the said goods or commodities; inspect the sutler's weights and measures ..." [War Department, 1861, para.
While a fully machined shirt is readily and inexpensively available "off the rack" at most sutlers, a hand-finished ranker's shirt takes about a week, with more time required for fancy ruffles for neck and cuffs which are added to the shirts for officers or NCOs.
The court [is] of opinion that Captain von Heer exacted, without authority, money for licensing sutlers, being a breach of Article 5th, Section 18th, of the Rules and Articles of War.
Therefore, he recommended ending the liquor ration except for extraordinary circumstances and instead allowing sutlers to sell liquor in moderate quantities.
In spite of this visual representation of Seacole's physical "difference," the Punch journalist reiterates the statement that Seacole is one of "our own." Evidently alluding to theatrical representations of sutlers, Punch asks: "Who would give a guinea to see a mimic sutler-woman, and a foreigner, frisk and amble about the stage, when he might bestow the money on a genuine English one [i.e., Seacole], reduced to a two-pair back, and in imminent danger of being obliged to climb into an attic?" (29)
I think quick and calmly walk to the sutlers wagon to by some candy.
Sutlers, setting up their tents in several rows to peddle their wares of firearms, leather goods, ammunition and clothing added a certain excitement to the air.
Among those followers longing to the army" were wives and children of enlistees, sutlers, servants, slaves, volunteers, and employees and managers of various staff departments, representing at any given time up to 50 percent of the army's numerical strength.
As sutlers, settlers, and traders, they became especially prominent in the Great Lakes fur trade.
Multiply all those T-shirt sellers, acid salesfolk and other sutlers of the Dead tours across the years.
Jews had been present in Quebec since 1760, when several arrived as sutlers with the British forces in the wake of the Conquest.
Soldiers, Sutlers, and Settlers: Garrison Life on the Texas Frontier.