Sutton Hoo


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Sutton Hoo

(sŭt`ən ho͞o), archaeological site near Woodbridge, SE Suffolk, E England, containing 11 barrows. Excavations here in 1938–39 revealed remains of a Saxon ship (c.660), which with its gold and silver treasures is now in the British Museum. The absence of a body and of personal objects in the ship has led archaeologists to conclude that the site was a cenotaph rather than a grave.

Sutton Hoo

 

an ancient tumular grave located east of Woodbridge, in Suffolk, England. Excavations conducted in 1938 and 1939 uncovered a burial in a large boat. Although the wood had rotted, the discovery of iron nails made it possible to reconstruct the outline of the boat and to determine that it was a burial ship similar to the burial ships discovered in central Sweden. The grave held many valuables, including a gold buckle in the animal style and various other ornaments, a purse containing Merovingian gold coins, a sword with a gold hilt, a shield, a lance, a steel helmet (probably of Swedish origin), and many silver bowls dating from the fifth and sixth centuries. There were no skeletal remains. Apparently the grave was a cenotaph, possibly of the East Anglian king Aethelhere, who died in the mid-seventh century.

REFERENCES

Wilson, D. M. The Anglo-Saxons. London, 1960.
Green, C. Sutton Hoo. London, 1963.
References in periodicals archive ?
THE DEAL: The three-bedroom apartment, which sleeps six, costs from PS415 for a week's rental through National Trust Holidays and includes free entry to Sutton Hoo.
The museum recently opened a newly refurbished display, Sutton Hoo and Europe AD 300-1100, the result of almost five years of work to redisplay the early medieval collections.
Two school mistresses and amateur photographers, Mercie Lack and Barbara Wagstaff, had the good fortune to come upon the Sutton Hoo excavations while holidaying in Suffolk in 1939.
She visits the Sutton Hoo site, as well as a pioneering project in Sittingbourne.
While avoiding the 'dark forces' that roam the galleries at night, they discover the history behind some of the museum's most famous exhibits, including the mystery of the Easter Island Statue, how the Rosetta Stone unlocked the secrets of Ancient Egypt, and the premonition that led to the discovery of the Sutton Hoo ship burial.
It is the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold ever found, with more than four times the amount found at the famed site at Sutton Hoo.
The quality of the Saxon jewellery found pinned to the body has already been compared to treasure found at the Sutton Hoo burial site in Suffolk in 1939, now on display at the British Museum.
The hoard exceeds the last big find of its kind, at Sutton Hoo in 1939.
The Staffordshire find - more than 1,500 pieces, from sword and dagger hilts and pieces of scabbards and helmets to Christian crosses and the figures of animals and fish - contains more gold and silver items than the famous Sutton Hoo discovery of 1939.
Is it too late for the Sutton Hoo, Which, When, Where and Why?
Sutton Hoo and its landscape; the context of monuments.
There is also silver and gold from Sutton Hoo although, as at Pouan (but not shown here), the rest of this assemblage was very eclectic.