Sutton Hoo


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Sutton Hoo

(sŭt`ən ho͞o), archaeological site near Woodbridge, SE Suffolk, E England, containing 11 barrows. Excavations here in 1938–39 revealed remains of a Saxon ship (c.660), which with its gold and silver treasures is now in the British Museum. The absence of a body and of personal objects in the ship has led archaeologists to conclude that the site was a cenotaph rather than a grave.

Sutton Hoo

 

an ancient tumular grave located east of Woodbridge, in Suffolk, England. Excavations conducted in 1938 and 1939 uncovered a burial in a large boat. Although the wood had rotted, the discovery of iron nails made it possible to reconstruct the outline of the boat and to determine that it was a burial ship similar to the burial ships discovered in central Sweden. The grave held many valuables, including a gold buckle in the animal style and various other ornaments, a purse containing Merovingian gold coins, a sword with a gold hilt, a shield, a lance, a steel helmet (probably of Swedish origin), and many silver bowls dating from the fifth and sixth centuries. There were no skeletal remains. Apparently the grave was a cenotaph, possibly of the East Anglian king Aethelhere, who died in the mid-seventh century.

REFERENCES

Wilson, D. M. The Anglo-Saxons. London, 1960.
Green, C. Sutton Hoo. London, 1963.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sutton Hoo, considered to be one of Britain's most important archaeological discoveries, is thought to be the final resting place of King Raedwald, who ruled in the seventh century.
Their illumination renders in paint the interlace of the Staffordshire and Sutton Hoo treasures and the wheeling trumpet-scrolls of the Hockwold enamelled mounts in the earlier wall display.
and the Sutton Hoo site, looked after by the National Trust.
One of the lyres was a copy of an instrument discovered in the grave of a seventh century nobleman; another was based on an instrument found in the Anglo-Saxon burial site at Sutton Hoo.
HE DIGS IT: TV expert Neil Oliver Sutton Hoo: 1939 be Raedwald, gles, who ASTOUNDING treasures were found at the burial place of an Anglo-Saxon king near Woodbrige, Suffolk, in 1939.
The exciting show will take audiences behind Hadrian's Wall and along to Sutton Hoo. Caratacus will try to stop the Romans crunching his Celts and King Alfred will try not to burn his buns.
Find out who's at Sutton Hoo! Expect Vicious Vikings sailing in to the audience too.
Find out who's at Sutton Hoo! Will you survive the Vicious Vikings as they sail into the audience?
The topics include Sutton Hoo and Sweden revisited, approaches to the Frankish community in the Chronicle of Fredegar and Liber Historiae Francorum, the development of diplomatic contacts and exchange between the Byzantine Empire and the Frankish kingdoms until the early eight century, from early Byzantium to the Middle Ages in Sagalassos, seventh-century movements of populations in the light of Egyptian papyri, Ibn al-Zybayr and legitimating power in seventh-century Islamic history, and irrigation in Khuzistan after the Sasanians.
The most spectacular was in 1938 when the remains of a 100ft ship filled with weapons, helmets, gold coins and silver-mounted drinking horns were found at Sutton Hoo in Suffolk.
The Ultimate Gateway: A Helmet from Sutton Hoo (Room 41)
Annual visitor numbers stand at 6 million - and little wonder when you consider the quality of the world collection here which includes famous items such as the Rosetta Stone, the Parthenon sculptures, and the Sutton Hoo helmet."