suture

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suture

1. Surgery
a. catgut, silk thread, or wire used to stitch together two bodily surfaces
b. the surgical seam formed after joining two surfaces
2. Anatomy a type of immovable joint, esp between the bones of the skull (cranial suture)
3. Zoology a line of junction in a mollusc shell, esp the line between adjacent chambers of a nautiloid shell
4. Botany a line marking the point of dehiscence in a seed pod or capsule

Suture

 

the surgical uniting, chiefly by a surgical needle and suture material, of tissues cut during surgery or separated by an injury. Threads made of silk, linen, or Dacron and other polymeric materials are used in superficial sutures. In buried sutures, which are applied to internal organs and tissues, absorbable materials, such as catgut or biologically inert polymeric threads, are used; buried sutures are not removed.

One type of superficial suture, cosmetic suture, which is applied to the face, is made using threads of horsehair or thin ca-pron. Osteorrhaphy (osteosynthesis) is a type of buried suture. Primary, primo-secondary, and secondary sutures are distinguished on the basis of when the sutures are applied, which depends on the type of wound. The sutureless union of tissues is achieved with various adhesives made from polymeric materials (for example, cyanoacrylate) or with metal clamps.

suture

[′sü·chər]
(biology)
A distinguishable line of union between two closely united parts.
(medicine)
A fine thread used to close a wound or surgical incision.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the literature, postoperative pain has been reported to be much greater using suture techniques. Considering onlay and sublay mesh repair techniques, Venclauskas et al.
[10] Our study is based on comparing continuous suture and interrupted suture (figure of eight) [11] in laparotomy in which the interrupted suture with using figure of eight suture technique is better than continuous suture technique.
In our study, the result for post-operative complications for seroma formation (Chi = 5.64, P = 0.009, <0.05), wound infection (chi = 7.05, P = 0.004<0.05), wound gaping (chi = 6.498, P = 0.005 <0.05), post-operative pain (chi = 4.15, P = 0.022<0.05) & risk for wound dehiscence (chi = 8.198, p = 0.002) and relative risk for wound dehiscence (RR = 0.572, p = 0.0003) is more with continuous suture technique than interrupted suture technique (figure of eight), this indicates that interrupted closure with figure of eight technique has significantly lesser complications as compared with continuous suture.
The decision regarding the extent of reconstruction and the use of VRC or conventional suture technique was made intraoperatively by the surgeon and supported by intraoperative evaluation of dynamic aortic valve and root properties by transesophageal echocardiogram and the fragility of the aortic tissue.
Of the 64 patients, with a mean age of 57.4 [+ or -] 12.7 years (range: 24-82 years) and a predominating male gender ( n = 42, 65.6%), 55 patients (36 males and 19 females) underwent aortic reconstruction with VRC (VRC group) and nine patients (six males and three females) with conventional suture technique (suture group).
Two-fold increase in the risk of uterine rupture was reported to be related with single layer closure.2On the contrary the meta-analysis published in 2011 revealed that locked but not unlocked single- layer closures were associated with a higher uterine rupture risk than double-layer closure in women at temping a trial of labor.3 These findings support Jelsema' s hypothesis that locked suture technique may develop ischemic necrosis of tissue due to the increased pressure.4 However recently the locked single-layer closure method of the lower uterine segment incision has been often preferred by surgeons to provide hemostasis.
Guyuron, "A comparison of different suture techniques for microvascular anastomosis," Annals of Plastic Surgery, vol.
* Group A: Continuous suturing: Continuous suture technique with continuous locking sutures in the vagina, perineum muscles and subcutaneous sutures for skin.
(4) The only difference was the suture technique. Less repair time, less suture material used and less short-term post-partum pain were the significant differences between the two groups.
Two different types of suture materials and three different types of suture techniques were applied keratometry was done preoperatively as well as after 15, 30, 60 and 90 days post operatively.
A prospectively randomized study (23) of 68 patients compared the healing rate using Arrows versus the inside-out horizontal suture technique. Unlike previous studies, (15,22,24) meniscal healing was evaluated with second-look arthroscopy at 3 to 4 months.