suture

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suture

1. Surgery
a. catgut, silk thread, or wire used to stitch together two bodily surfaces
b. the surgical seam formed after joining two surfaces
2. Anatomy a type of immovable joint, esp between the bones of the skull (cranial suture)
3. Zoology a line of junction in a mollusc shell, esp the line between adjacent chambers of a nautiloid shell
4. Botany a line marking the point of dehiscence in a seed pod or capsule

Suture

 

the surgical uniting, chiefly by a surgical needle and suture material, of tissues cut during surgery or separated by an injury. Threads made of silk, linen, or Dacron and other polymeric materials are used in superficial sutures. In buried sutures, which are applied to internal organs and tissues, absorbable materials, such as catgut or biologically inert polymeric threads, are used; buried sutures are not removed.

One type of superficial suture, cosmetic suture, which is applied to the face, is made using threads of horsehair or thin ca-pron. Osteorrhaphy (osteosynthesis) is a type of buried suture. Primary, primo-secondary, and secondary sutures are distinguished on the basis of when the sutures are applied, which depends on the type of wound. The sutureless union of tissues is achieved with various adhesives made from polymeric materials (for example, cyanoacrylate) or with metal clamps.

suture

[′sü·chər]
(biology)
A distinguishable line of union between two closely united parts.
(medicine)
A fine thread used to close a wound or surgical incision.
References in periodicals archive ?
0003) is more with continuous suture technique than interrupted suture technique (figure of eight), this indicates that interrupted closure with figure of eight technique has significantly lesser complications as compared with continuous suture.
In a study done by Kumar et al, [13] interrupted X suture technique was better than continuous suture technique in prevention of burst abdomen in both emergency and in elective surgery with relative risk of 0.
A study by Wissing J et al [15] showed higher incidence of wound sepsis with continuous suture technique which was 41% as compared to interrupted suture technique of 18.
The decision regarding the extent of reconstruction and the use of VRC or conventional suture technique was made intraoperatively by the surgeon and supported by intraoperative evaluation of dynamic aortic valve and root properties by transesophageal echocardiogram and the fragility of the aortic tissue.
6%), 55 patients (36 males and 19 females) underwent aortic reconstruction with VRC (VRC group) and nine patients (six males and three females) with conventional suture technique (suture group).
3 These findings support Jelsema' s hypothesis that locked suture technique may develop ischemic necrosis of tissue due to the increased pressure.
As shown in this prospective study, intraoperative glove perforation occurs with high frequency when both barbed and standard suture techniques are used for closure of the deep fascia.
Two different types of suture materials and three different types of suture techniques were applied keratometry was done preoperatively as well as after 15, 30, 60 and 90 days post operatively.
Though degree of postoperative final astigmatism was equal with cross interrupted and continuous suture techniques, when 8-0 black virgin silk sutures were applied, but application of continuous suture was not found feasible with such coarser sutures.
20,25) These studies had success rates greater that 80% for repair using arrows (89% of 85 patients at 3 years (25); 87% of 55 patients at 6 years (20)) which in each case were concluded to be results comparable to those of traditional inside-out suture techniques.
20) At 13-year follow-up, 20 patients that underwent meniscal repair using the inside-out suture technique were either examined (13 patients) or contacted through a telephone interview (7 patients).