sweatshop

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sweatshop:

see sweating systemsweating system,
method of exploiting labor by supplying materials to workers and paying by the piece (see piecework) for work done on those materials in the workers' homes or in small workshops (sweatshops).
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References in periodicals archive ?
His book is especially adept at for dispelling the notion that sweatshops are primarily a developing country problem, or that the existence of sweatshops in the U.S.
SweatX could also link with human rights and labor groups like United Students Against Sweatshops (www.studentsagainstsweatshops.org) and the National Labor Committee (www.nlcnet.org), which have spent the past decade exposing sweatshop abuses and supporting workers' struggles to unionize around the world.
However, neither viewpoint fully addresses all of the moral, ethical, and economic dilemmas that sweatshops present.
By definition, any workplace with more than one such violation is considered a "sweatshop," according to the U.S.
Fearful that clothes made in filthy shops would spread germs and disease to middle-class consumers, Progressive reform leaders forged a coalition with labor and policymakers to rid the city of sweatshops. The anti-sweatshop campaign also attracted the support of German Jews and of male Jewish tailors themselves.
Contrary to popular belief, drawing attention to sweatshops doesn't close them down.
Recognizing the need for independent monitoring of factories, McMaster has become the first Canadian university to join the Worker Rights Consortium, a non-profit agency that campaigns against sweatshops and helps to police factory compliance with no-sweat codes.
Unfortunately even SweatX's trade union customers, members of the AFL-CIO, seem unwilling at the present time to take a stand against agricultural sweatshops and pesticides by paying a bit more for organic T-shirts and sweatshirts bearing their union logos.
Liza Featherstone's new book, Students against Sweatshops, examines what is probably the most important manifestation of this movement--the student-led struggle against sweatshops.
The pressure mounted by these and other groups has been so effective that Clinton's first term Secretary of Labor, Robert Reich, created a presidential task force whose goal was to eliminate sweatshops. Hiss successor, Alexis Herman, attempted to bring unity to a fair labor agreement that retailers, manufacturers and UNITE could agree on.
Latina/os represent 60 percent and Asians 35 percent of workers in all garment factories in the United States which the government classifies as sweatshops. Latina/os represent 53 percent and Asians 25 percent of workers in sweatshop restaurants.
The sharp criticisms of the FLA within certain quarters of the movement spurred the emergence in fall 1997 of a nationwide network of student anti-sweatshop groups, which by summer 1998 had formed the United Students Against Sweatshops (USAS).