swing bridge

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Related to Swing bridges: suspension bridge

swing bridge

1. a low bridge that can be rotated about a vertical axis, esp to permit the passage of ships
2. NZ a pedestrian bridge over a river, suspended by heavy wire cables
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

swing bridge

A bridge that opens by turning horizontally on a turntable supported on a pier. See also: Bridge
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

swing bridge

[′swiŋ ‚brij]
(civil engineering)
A movable bridge that pivots in a horizontal plane about a center pier.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The High Level and Swing Bridges, with the Tyne Bridge under construction, c1927 (Historic England)
The Swing Bridge opened to road traffic - horses and carts - just over two and half decades later, on June 25, 1876.
When ships need to pass along the Manchester Ship Canal, the iron caisson of the aqueduct turns like a swing bridge upon a central pier.
A Peel spokesman said: "We are somewhat disappointed by Warrington Borough Council's comments regarding the swing bridges in Warrington as we have been engaged in active - and what we thought was constructive - dialogue with the cabinet member for transportation as well as with other senior highways officials within the council.
"In a series of meetings with them over the last two years we have discussed and agreed a number of actions to mitigate the issues associated with the swing bridges; actions which are exactly in line with the proposed support measures that the council details in its comments today.
A spokesman for Newcastle City Council said: "Our works are on the Swing Bridge, which doesn't have much traffic.
The Swing Bridge has temporary traffic lights during off-peak periods due to bridge painting.
FOR 23 years George Fenwick, of Wallsend, has manned the River Tyne Swing Bridge, opening up both road and water to cars and ships alike.
Such concerns are all part of the job on the Swing Bridge. Since 1898, 63-year-old George has had to ensure that such concerns do not bring both Newcastle and Gateshead to a standstill.
The refurbishment will continue for six months, and the Canning river entrance swing bridge and the riverside walkway behind the Albert Dock will be closed while work goes on
One of Newcastle's famous bridges is getting a face-lift as painters get to work on giving the Swing Bridge a new look in time for the Capital of Culture countdown.
After the Tyne Bridge got a new lick of paint two years ago, it is the turn of the smaller but no less striking Swing Bridge to get a new look to return it to its former glory.