Syllepsis


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Syllepsis

 

(also called zeugma), a stylistic device consisting of the union of disparate terms in a common syntactic or semantic unit. An example of syllepsis with syntactic dissimilarity is “We love glory, we love to drown our dissipated intellect in drink” (A. S. Pushkin). This example unites direct objects which are expressed by a noun and an infinitive. An example of syllepsis with phraseological dissimilarity is I. A. Krylov’s line “The scandalmonger’s eyes and teeth flashed,” which combines the phrase “eyes flashed” with the extraneous word “teeth.” An example of syllepsis with semantic dissimilarity is “Filled with sounds and confusion” (A. S. Pushkin), which describes an emotional state and its cause. In elevated literary style, syllepsis gives an impression of nervous carelessness, and in low style it has a comic effect (“the rains and two students came”).

References in periodicals archive ?
Riffaterre's notion of syllepsis, the intertextual trope most frequently used by Kopcewicz in his essays, implies the existence of such unity also between the source texts and their interpretants.
A strong syllepsis in French, "Mauvais Genres" was the title of an exhibit and debate (Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, 1999) where "gore" and horror film and literature were explored.
The concept of the 'archaic phantasm' is related to the maternal, which--like the concept of the messianic--is a syllepsis or doubled-trope: the mother in Specters of Marx is 'on the one hand' a revolutionary and figurative resource to inspire praxis, and, 'on the other hand' a literal complex or 'problematic' like any other (such as the Hamlet complex, the Horatio complex, etc.
Dismantling the original Latin ars est caelare artem, Trellis leaves out the "creative" in it, buries it in the text, so to speak, and highlights the anatomical connotation of the pun in order to use it as a critical descriptive term, yet in a pun nether meaning can exist without its opposite; intrinsically bound together they generate syllepsis in Trellis' staircase fragment.
The full description of Raffeterre's version of syllepsis runs as follows: "the trope that consists in using one word for two incompatible meanings without repeating that word.
This complex syllepsis suggests that "crossing" indicates an act of great importance that involves relation to the sacred.
Metaleptically, syllepsis indirectly tropes the absent speaker into an electric circuit whose energy has merged with the earth's, a circuit empty of its own energy.
This is because "chasseur de tetes" is a syllepsis, not a hunter of heads, but a hunter in heads, or the Surrealist seeking to penetrate the unconscious.
The sixteenth-century rhetorician George Puttenham called syllepsis "the figure of double supply" (168): it occurs when a single word is doubly contextualized, usually by participation in more than one syntactic construction, and thereby has more than one of its possible meanings brought into play.
The noun-verb "pun" did not appear in English until after the language had begu to be stabilized and institutionalized by dictionaries in the eighteenth century, and its appearance coincides with a shift in attitude toward syllepsis and kindred figures.
Shakespeare's use of this kind of wordplay goes far beyond any other poet of the Renaissance, and it is much more pervasive in the Sonnets than rhetorical terms like syllepsis and antanaclasis can properly suggest.