Sylvester II


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Sylvester II,

c.945–1003, pope (999–1003), a Frenchman (b. Auvergne) named Gerbert; successor of Gregory V. In his youth he studied at Muslim schools in Spain and became learned in mathematics and astronomy. Returning to France, he began teaching in the bishop's school at Reims. In 991, Gerbert, now widely celebrated as a teacher, was elected archbishop of Reims; but his predecessor had been deposed illegally, and eventually (995) Gerbert's election was nullified. He joined Holy Roman Emperor Otto III as his teacher and went with him to Italy, where Pope Gregory V made him archbishop of Ravenna. Upon Gregory's death, Otto presented Gerbert as his papal candidate. As pope, Sylvester aided energetically in the Christianization of Poland and Hungary and worked closely with Otto in the restoration of the Holy Roman Empire. In the later Middle Ages his learning became legendary and was in popular belief transformed into skill at sorcery. He wrote on theology, mathematics, and the natural sciences. Sylvester was the first French pope, and of the popes of the 10th cent. he was the only one of distinction. He was succeeded by John XVII.

Sylvester II

original name Gerbert of Aurillac. c. 940--1003 ad, French ecclesiastic and scholar; pope (999--1003): noted for his achievements in mathematics and astronomy
References in periodicals archive ?
Those whose memories go back to the 1950s will remember the front-running grey Sylvester II, whose riders included Bill Jones, April Budgen, Penny Pragnell and Daphne Williams.
He became pope in 999 and adopted the name Sylvester II.
Sylvester II, DPSS Assistant Director and Department Chief Information Officer.
Pope Sylvester II [999-1003] had a great reputation as a scholar before ascending the throne of Saint Peter.
When Gregory V died in 999, Otto put Gerbert of Aurillac on the papal throne as Sylvester II -- a significant name.
For most readers, this is where Lowney's work especially shines, as one is continuously introduced to such erudite individuals as Gerbert of Aurillac, the future Pope Sylvester II, who studied at the Benedictine Albelda Monastery in northern Spain.