Symmetrodonta


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Symmetrodonta

[‚sim·ə·trə′dänt·ə]
(paleontology)
An order of the extinct mammalian infraclass Pantotheria distinguished by the central high cusp, flanked by two smaller cusps and several low minor cusps, on the upper and lower molars.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Symmetrodonta

 

an order of fossil mammals that lived from the end of the Triassic to the early Cretaceous. Symmetrodonta were small animals, no larger than martens. Each molar was topped by tubercles arranged in a symmetrical triangle. The mammals were apparently predators. They are known from deposits in Europe and North America, where jaws and teeth have been found. Symmetrodonta were closely related to Pantotheria.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.