Symphytum


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Related to Symphytum: arnica, comfrey, Hypericum

Symphytum

 

a genus of perennial plants of the family Boraginaceae. The plants are tall, usually coarse grasses. The leaves are entire and alternate. The flowers, which are purple-violet, blue, pink, yellow, or white, are in whorled inflorescences. There are approximately 25 species of Symphytum, distributed in Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa. Ten species are found in the USSR, growing primarily in moist areas. The common comfrey (S. officinalis) grows in the forest and steppe zones. It contains alkaloids and tannic substances in its roots and rhizomes. The plant is used medicinally for man and animals as an anti-inflammatory and coagulant. The prickly comfrey (S. asper-um), which grows in the Caucasus and the European USSR (where it has been imported), is used as feed, primarily for swine and rabbits. Both species are highly nectariferous and provide dyes. The tuberous thickened rhizomes of S. tuberosum are edible. Some species, such as S. caucasicum and S. grandiflorum, are sometimes cultivated as ornamentals.

REFERENCE

Atlas lekarstvennykh rastenii SSSR. Moscow, 1962.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of a blend of comfrey root extract (Symphytum officinale L.) and tannic acid creams in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multi clinical trials.
Though they are still building up stock, Symphytum Moorland Heather looks like a good clump-forming comfrey, with unusual purple flowers.
Inflammation modulators, such as deglycyrrhizinated licorice, Calendula officinalis (calendula), Curcuma longa (turmeric), Zingiber officinale (ginger), Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary), and Symphytum officinale (comfrey) may also help with tissue repair and symptom control.
Enw arall ar y cyfardwf neu'r cwmffri (Symphytum officinale; common comfrey) yn Saesneg ydi 'knitbone', ac mae'r enw yn dweud y cyfan - defnyddid gwreiddiau'r cyfardwf er mwyn asio esgyrn oedd wedi torri.
En el presente estudio se caracterizaron nutricionalmente nueve recursos forrajeros promisorios: Confrey (Symphytum peregrinum), especie rastrera utilizada principalmente en la alimentacion alternativa de conejos; Morera (Morus alba), es una especie arbustiva ampliamente empleada en el mundo para la alimentacion de humanos y animales de todo tipo, por su gran valor nutricional; San Joaquin (Malvaviscus penduliflorus) arbustiva de uso principalmente ornamental; Nacedero (Trichanthera gigantea), arbustiva de uso comun en alimentacion de rumiantes y monogastricos; Boton de Oro (Tithonia diversifolia Hemsl.
Good examples of medicinal plants introduced to gardens are motherwort Leonurus cardiaca, common comfrey Symphytum officinale, and absintium Artemisia absinthium.
(1999), foi demonstrado o efeito de um medicamento fitoterapico composto por Symphytum officinale (confrei) e Calendula officinalis no processo de reparo em fendas de extracao dentaria em camundongos, evidenciando aceleracao na maturacao do tecido osseo neoformado.
This study compared an ointment containing an extract of comfrey root, Symphytum officinale, (Kytta-Salbe(R) f; Merck Selbstmedikation GmbH) with a placebo ointment in patients with acute upper or lower back pain.
But plant-wise the journey is far-ranging, what with stops for chatter about sweet rocket (Hesperis matronalis, you can eat the flowers), California poppies (Eschscholzia californica, and not really poppies at all), comfrey (Symphytum officinale, a bee magnet but it will take over your garden), blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum, related to the huckleberries scattered through the Coast Range) and common mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris, the whole genus has medicinal uses).
It has to be mentioned that the earliest known illustration of a plant is a drawing of symphytum or comfrey (Symphytum officinale L.), from a fragment known as the Johnson Papyrus, made c.
Complementary and other interventions (n = 3): One high quality study (Kucera et al 2004) and one low quality study (Koll et al 2004) found that application of an ointment consisting of extracts from comfrey root (Symphytum officinale) was a safe and effective option in the acute phases after ankle sprain.