Symplegades


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Symplegades

(sĭmplĕg`ədēz), in Greek mythology, two floating cliffs that swung together and crushed anything going between them until Jason's ship, the Argo, passed safely through them. They remained still forever after, forming the entrance to the Black Sea.

Symplegades

“Clashing Cliffs” at the entrance to the Black Sea, said to crush vessels. [Classical Myth.: New Century, 1043]
See: Danger

Symplegades

cliffs at Black Sea entrance; clashed together as ships passed through. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 251]
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Krasne argues that the rear half of the Argo appears in Aratus as the homonymous constellation, whereas Valerius identifies this part of the ship as being destroyed by the Symplegades while the rest is catasterized (pp.
Elsewhere we find a retelling of the incident at the Symplegades, also known as the Clashing Rocks.
This was the dove that the Argonauts released to test the Symplegades, rock cliffs that would briefly pull apart and then smash together again.
These and other passages, such as the description of the Symplegades (p.
and SW of Solis Lacus (Adachi, Sep 2-8, variable positions), Symplegades Insulae (S.
A contemporary, Daniele Caetani of Cremona wrote, "Lucas Paciolus has penetrated between the Symplegades and into the many swirling Charybdis of error, the road has been made even, the passage safe, the route unencumbered through the dark byways, and the true Euclid has been brought back accessible to everyone.
37) Accordingly, in a magical simile of association, the Tuteloes were given mythical origins while poised at the Symplegades where the oppositional dualities of the soul must be met before passing on to the hero's adventure that, in this case, lay beyond in Iroquoia.
A Santa Ana Hueytlalpan, il doit franchir des Symplegades qui s'entrechoquent a son passage et peuvent entrainer sa mort.
The greatest danger they encounter in trying to reach their goal is a stormy sea in which they must pass through the shifting or clashing rocks, the Planctae or Symplegades, which the sea alternately pushes apart and brings together.
nineteen unconvertible words in Greek character) This passage shares interesting points of contact with Apollonius' account of the Argo's voyage through the Symplegades, an episode which similarly involves the salvation, by divine intervention, of a ship in trouble at sea.
26) In the case of the Theocritean storm scene and the Apollonian Symplegades episode, the sympathetic vibration depends on lexical, syntactic, and contextual features: both Theocritus' (two unconvertible words in Greek character) the Apollonius' (one unconvertible word in Greek character) occur as a large wave threatens to crash down on, or actually does crash down on, ships at sea, and in each case the vessels are ultimately saved only by divine intercession--the Dioscuri's in one case, Athena's in the other.
With Uncle George in the stern, and Tom in the bows, each using a spruce pole about twelve feet long, pointed with iron, (2) and poling on the same side, we shot up the rapids like a salmon, the water rushing and roaring around, so that only a practiced eye could distinguish a safe course, or tell what was deep water and what rocks, frequently grazing the latter on one or both sides, with a hundred as narrow escapes as ever the Argo had in passing through the Symplegades.