Syncretism

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syncretism

the combination of elements from different religions or different cultural traditions. Syncretism in religious belief and practices has been especially associated with contexts, e.g. colonialism, in which a major religion is brought into contact with local religions, but it can also be seen as a general feature of the transformation of religions or cultures and of DIASPORAS. See also CULT, CARGO CULT, POSTCOLONIAL THEORY.

Syncretism

 

(1) The absence of differentiation that characterizes an undeveloped state of certain phenomena. Examples are art during the initial stages of human culture, when music, singing, poetry, and the dance were not distinguished from one another, and a child’s mental functions during the early stages of its development.

(2) The blending or inorganic merging of heterogeneous elements. An example is the merging of different cults and religious systems in late antiquity— the religous syncretism of the Hellenistic period.

(3) In philosophy, syncretism denotes a variant of eclecticism.


Syncretism

 

in linguistics, the merging of once formally distinct grammatical categories or meanings into one form, which, as a result, becomes polysemous or polyfunctional. In Latin, for example, syncretism in the case system led to a combining of the functions of the instrumental and locative cases in the ablative case. Syncretism can occur not only in the morphology but also in the syntax of a language. The concept of syncretism is paradigmatic, differing from the syntagmatic neutralization of oppositions. Syncretism is an irreversible systemic shift in the process of the development of a language; neutralization is a living process associated with the use of linguistic units in speech.

References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, for a significant number of Singaporean "Buddhists", "Buddhism" actually refers to Chinese syncretic religions consisting of Buddhist, Confucianist, and Taoist elements (Wee 1997, p.
Haiti's never had smooth anything, and Dubois suggests why in a series of shrewd explorations of pre-1804 plantation life, the social ambitions of "free coloreds," the terror of field slaves after branding (as if they were livestock) and torture (lopped-off ears, boiling cane juice, live burial), bartering sex for emancipation, syncretic religions like "Vaudoux"--and even, after the insurrectionary wars and the atrocity swappings, Toussaint's very own "militarized" labor policy and "police state.
Yet those who concede that Africanity is more obvious in such syncretic religions do not deny it existed among black Protestants in what was later to become the United States.
Another problem is the author's inadequate familiarity with the syncretic religions of African origin in the Spanish Caribbean region.
In the presentations, concerns ranged from Magali Quinones' description of the profession of poet in contemporary Puerto Rico, to Corrie van Heijningen's explanation of the influence of Sesame Street on her work in educational television, to Rhoda Arrindell's analysis of indigenization as prism, to Alexander Cifuentes' examination of the negative impact of stereotypical depictions of women in Colombia, to Silvia Garcia-Sierra's discussion of syncretic religions in Cuba, to Velma Solomons' application of Tataism to Caribbean women's lives, to Celilia Everts' homily on the adage "Love without suffering is a jewel that has no value.
Southern Baptists, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), Jehovah's Witnesses, Presbyterians, and Pentecostals successfully find converts in different regions, particularly among indigenous people in the Sierra provinces of Chimborazo, Bolivar, Cotopaxi, Imbabura, and Pichincha, especially among persons who practiced syncretic religions, as well as in groups marginalized by society.
There have always been people who discard the elements of their faith that they dislike, and there have always been syncretic religions that fuse one spiritual system with another.
Followers of African and syncretic religions such as Candomble, Xango, Macumba, and Umbanda constituted an estimated 0.
Guerrillas or paramilitaries harassed some indigenous groups that practiced animistic or syncretic religions.
Southern Baptists, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), Jehovah's Witnesses, Presbyterians, and Pentecostals have successfully found converts in different regions, particularly among indigenous people in the Sierra provinces of Chimborazo, Bolivar, Cotopaxi, Imbabura, and Pichincha, especially among persons who practiced syncretic religions, as well as in groups marginalized by society.
Southern Baptists, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), Jehovah's Witnesses, and Pentecostals have successfully found converts in different regions, particularly among indigenous people in the Sierra provinces of Chimborazo and Pichincha, among persons who practice syncretic religions, and in groups that are marginalized by society.
Southern Baptists, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), members of Jehovah's Witnesses, and Pentecostals have successfully found converts in different regions, particularly among indigenous people in the Sierra provinces of Chimborazo and Pichincha, among persons who practice syncretic religions, and in groups that are marginalized by society.